ABR Arts

Gerhard Richter: The life of images (QAGOMA)

Louise Martin-Chew
Monday, 16 October 2017

A rainy weekend heralded the opening of Gerhard Richter’s exhibition at Brisbane’s Gallery of Modern Art. Gerhard Richter is famous for achieving the highest auction price for a living European artist (Abstraktes Bild fetched US$46.3 million in 2015), but his importance as an artist is due to his commitment to painting during a postwar period when many ...

Norma (Metropolitan Opera) ★★

Ian Dickson
Monday, 16 October 2017

Vincenzo Bellini’s Norma elicits the ultimate rose-tinted nostalgia in ageing opera aficionados. Operagoers of my generation wax lyrical about Joan Sutherland and Montserrat Caballé in their prime, while making disparaging remarks about present singers. We in turn were bored by ancients who admitted that La Callas ...

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New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art is known for its large-scale, ‘blockbuster’ exhibitions. These are usually impressive, often enlightening. But sometimes it can be even more rewarding (and less exhausting) to visit a show on a much smaller scale. Such is the case at the moment at The Met, where six paintings by modern ...

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The Update - October 10, 2017

ABR Arts
Tuesday, 10 October 2017

In this fortnight's Update: British Film Festival, Kazuo Ishiguro, Victorian Opera's 2018 season, Tarnanthi, Gert and Bess at TheatreiNQ, Kwame Kwei-Armah, Russian Film Festival, Jill Bilcock, Anh Do's portait of Uncle Jack, Cans Film Festival, This is Desmondo Ray!, and theatre and film giveaways ...

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Tom of Finland ★★★1/2

Dion Kagan
Tuesday, 10 October 2017

Tom of Finland is a worthy enshrinement of the life of Finnish artist Touko Laaksonen (1920–91) into the cinematic pantheon of queer historical biographies. The World War II veteran and advertising art director best known as ‘Tom of Finland’ drew thousands of naked and leather-clad men with gigantic nipples and ...

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American Song (Red Stitch Actors' Theatre) ★★★★

Fiona Gruber
Monday, 09 October 2017

Leaves of Grass, Walt Whitman’s humanistic, wheeling manifesto of the American destiny underpins Australian playwright Joanna Murray-Smith’s one-man play, American Song, and the collection of poems form the credo and frame the questioning of its central character, Andy. The poems’ exploration of a world of natural ...

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Fred Williams in the You Yangs (Geelong Gallery)

Irena Zdanowicz
Friday, 06 October 2017

For my return visit to the exhibition Fred Williams in the You Yangs at the Geelong Gallery, I decided to take the train instead of driving, as I usually do. Although the creeping suburban sprawl, especially around Melbourne, has narrowed the area without housing or industrial estates, there is still just enough left of the flat ...

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Blade Runner 2049 ★★★

Harry Windsor
Thursday, 05 October 2017

The new Blade Runner doesn’t surpass the original, contra some breathless early reviews, but what could? Ridley Scott’s 1982 classic is a remarkable feat of design, the perfect vehicle for a director who received his training at the Royal College of Art, and a streamlined thriller with existential heft. It features a haunting score from ...

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Song to Song ★★★

Francesca Sasnaitis
Monday, 02 October 2017

Song to Song is writer and director Terrence Malick’s cinematic version of the modernist literary experiment: multiple internalised viewpoints, stream-of-consciousness narrative, chronological fragmentation, and a reality apprehended through symbolic or metaphoric conjunction. He is abetted in this project by ...

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Some singers – a gifted few – have voices that are so sumptuously individual that even one note instantly identifies them to the listener. In opera, Joan Sutherland and Luciano Pavarotti have that status, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau in lieder, Elvis Presley and Louis Armstrong in rock and jazz. But none more so than Maria Callas ...

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