June–July 2019, issue no. 412

Ferocious grace
Felicity Plunkett on Nick Cave and trauma's aftermath
Calibre Prize: 'Floundering'
Runner-up Sarah Walker's personal essay on pregnancy
#MeToo: A reckoning
Zora Simic on #MeToo, a compilations of essays on the movement
Spring is here
Jack Callil on Ali Smith's new novel
Tell us your Favourite Australian Novel (since 2000)
And be in the running to win great prizes!
Ted Chiang's Exhalation
Lisa Bennett on the author's new collection of short stories

Welcome to the June–July issue of ABR!
Highlights include:

Ferocious grace
Felicity Plunkett on Nick Cave and trauma's aftermath

Calibre Prize: 'Floundering'
Runner-up Sarah Walker's personal essay on pregnancy

Spring is here
Jack Callil on Ali Smith's new novel

Bedlam at Botany Bay
Alan Atkinson on James Dunk's history of New South Wales

#MeToo: A reckoning
Zora Simic on #MeToo, a compilation of essays on the movement

The ABR Favourite Australian Novel poll
Vote now and win one of three great prizes!

 

Sign up to ABR newsletters

More from the current issue

Jack Callil reviews Spring by Ali Smith

Jack Callil
Uncertainty is the new norm. Nationalist rhetoric is rife. Donald Trump is running for the US presidency. It’s June 2016 and the Brexit referendum has dazed the international community, heralding the start of the United Kingdom’s glacial extraction from the European Union. Amid the turmoil, Irish novelist Ali Smith releases Autumn ...

Glyn Davis reviews Winners Take All: The elite charade of changing the world by Anand Giridharadas

Glyn Davis

From McKinsey analyst to honoured author, New York Times correspondent, familiar face on MSNBC. Awarded a prestigious Henry Crown Fellowship at Aspen, invited onto private planes amid discussion of drinking-water projects in Kenya and improved farm supply chains in India. Not one but two TED talks ...

Alice Whitmore reviews Requiem with Yellow Butterflies by James Halford

Alice Whitmore

Requiem with Yellow Butterflies begins, aptly, with a death. Sitting at his office in Brisbane, the author receives news that Gabriel García Márquez has died at his home in Mexico. Across the world, there is a mushrooming of obituaries. Garlands of yellow butterflies are draped from trees and buildings; outside Mexico City’s Palacio de Bellas Artes ...

Daniel May reviews Black Saturday: Not the end of the story by Peg Fraser

Daniel May

Stories are at the heart of Peg Fraser’s compassionate and thoughtful book about Strathewen and the 2009 Black Saturday bushfires. The initial impression gained by the subtitle, Not the end of the story, could be one of defiance, a familiar narrative of a community stoically recovering and rebuilding ...

Also in this issue