May 2019, issue no. 411

Dollars, pounds, and euros
Kieran Pender on Moneyland by Oliver Bullough
This is the way the world ends
Beejay Silcox on the lure of dystopian fiction
Daniel Halliday on tax justice
And why politicians find it so hard
Ian McEwan's Machines Like Me
Paul Giles reviews the author's latest sci-fi-inspired novel
Nam Le on David Malouf
Peter Rose reviews On David Malouf by Nam Le
'The sound of nothing at all'
Johanna Leggatt on City of Trees by Sophie Cunningham

Welcome to the May issue of ABR!
Highlights include:

Dollars, pounds, and euros
Kieran Pender on Moneyland by Oliver Bullough

'The sound of nothing at all'
Johanna Leggatt on City of Trees by Sophie Cunningham

Nam Le on David Malouf
Peter Rose reviews Nam Le's On David Malouf

This is the way the world ends
Beejay Silcox on dystopian fiction in the age of Trump

Daniel Halliday on tax justice
And why politicians find it so hard

Ian McEwan's Machines Like Me
Paul Giles on McEwan's latest sci-fi-inspired fiction

 

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Not many peoples are able to read poems in their language written one thousand years ago, as Persian speakers in Iran, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan do today with Ferdowsi’s Shahnameh, meaning the ‘Book of Kings’. The Shahnameh is Iran’s national epic, a vast compilation of pre-Islamic Iranian myths, legends, and imperial history ... 

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