June–July 2019, issue no. 412

Ferocious grace
Felicity Plunkett on Nick Cave and trauma's aftermath
Calibre Prize: 'Floundering'
Runner-up Sarah Walker's personal essay on pregnancy
#MeToo: A reckoning
Zora Simic on #MeToo, a compilations of essays on the movement
Spring is here
Jack Callil on Ali Smith's new novel
Tell us your Favourite Australian Novel (since 2000)
And be in the running to win great prizes!
Ted Chiang's Exhalation
Lisa Bennett on the author's new collection of short stories

Welcome to the June–July issue of ABR!
Highlights include:

Ferocious grace
Felicity Plunkett on Nick Cave and trauma's aftermath

Calibre Prize: 'Floundering'
Runner-up Sarah Walker's personal essay on pregnancy

Spring is here
Jack Callil on Ali Smith's new novel

Bedlam at Botany Bay
Alan Atkinson on James Dunk's history of New South Wales

#MeToo: A reckoning
Zora Simic on #MeToo, a compilation of essays on the movement

The ABR Favourite Australian Novel poll
Vote now and win one of three great prizes!

 

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More from the current issue

News from the Editor's Desk - June–July 2019

Australian Book Review

ABR News: The winner of the Calibre Essay Prize; the ABR Favourite Australian Novel poll; our new column, Epiphany; Monash University sells film rights for Half A Perfect World; Hilary Mantel's new novel; Mary-Kay Wilmers; Anchuli Felicia King; and more!

Zora Simic #MeToo: Stories from the Australian movement edited by Natalie Kon-yu et al.

Zora Simic

How do we get the measure of the phenomenon that is #MeToo? Both deeply personal and profoundly structural, #MeToo has been described as a movement, a moment, and a reckoning. Some critics have dismissed it as man-hating or anti-sex; sceptics as a misguided millennial distraction from more serious feminist concerns ...

Desley Deacon reviews Seven Big Australians: Adventures with comic actors by Anne Pender

Desley Deacon

Nowadays every second young person seems to want to be a stand-up comic, an occupation that perfectly represents the ‘gig’ economy in its precariousness and occasional nature. Anne Pender gives us mini-biographies of seven Australians who succeeded, often spectacularly, in the risky business of being a comic long ...

Stephen Dedman reviews Eight Lives by Susan Hurley

Stephen Dedman
Eight Lives is a meticulously crafted first novel by Susan Hurley, a 2017 Peter Carey Short Story Award nominee and a medical researcher with more than thirty years’ experience in the pharmaceutical industry. It’s an intricate thriller told in a multiple first-person style by friends, family, and associates of the late Dr David Tran, all of whom feel some responsibility for his horrific death ...

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