From the Issue

Letters to the Editor
Letters

Letters to the Editor

by Carla Lipsig-Mumme, Michael Henry, Ben Brooker, Michael Morley, Vivian Morrigan, Yves Rees

ABR Arts

Most Popular

Book of the Week

Indigenous Studies

Truganini: Journey through the apocalypse by Cassandra Pybus

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Truganini: Journey through the apocalypse follows the life of the strong Nuenonne woman who lived through the dramatic upheavals of invasion and dispossession and became known around the world as the so-called ‘last Tasmanian’. But the figure at the heart of this book is George Augustus Robinson, the self-styled missionary and chronicler who was charged with ‘conciliating’ with the Tasmanian Aboriginal peoples. It is primarily through his journals that historians are able to glimpse and piece together the world fractured by European arrival.

Interview

March 2019, no. 409

Open Page with Debra Adelaide

Generally where I am right now, in my study writing, but also in the garden. It is very uncomplicated. 

Interview

August 2019, no. 413

Open Page with Bruce Pascoe

Mum and dad. I still need to talk to them. My kids, Marnie and Jack. Best meal was scallops and a few beers with my son at Huonville on a pontoon in the river.

Interview

August 2019, no. 413

Open Page with Bruce Pascoe

Mum and dad. I still need to talk to them. My kids, Marnie and Jack. Best meal was scallops and a few beers with my son at Huonville on a pontoon in the river.

From the Archive

From the Archive

June 1998, no. 201

Eucalyptus: A novel' by Murray Bail by Murray Bail

Murray Bail has passed muster as an important Australian novelist for quite a while now.  His 1980 novel Homesickness, with its sustained parodic conceit of Australian tourists forever entering the prefab theme park, rather than its ‘real’ original, was an early national venture into what might have been postmodernism. Holden's Performance, a good time later ...

From the Archive

November 2008, no. 306

The Independence of Miss Mary Bennet by Colleen McCullough

It is quite extraordinary how often in this country we resort to caricature in our cultural expression. Think of the hammy acting in Australian films and television, the switches in levels of reality in Patrick White’s novels and plays, the new lead William Dobell gave to modern Australian painting or Keith Looby designs for Wagner. Peter Carey has made his fortune from it; Bill Leak has made it his trademark. And no, we won’t start on the politicians, thank you.

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