June–July 2019, issue no. 412

Ferocious grace
Felicity Plunkett on Nick Cave and trauma's aftermath
Calibre Prize: 'Floundering'
Runner-up Sarah Walker's personal essay on pregnancy
#MeToo: A reckoning
Zora Simic on #MeToo, a compilations of essays on the movement
Spring is here
Jack Callil on Ali Smith's new novel
Tell us your Favourite Australian Novel (since 2000)
And be in the running to win great prizes!
Ted Chiang's Exhalation
Lisa Bennett on the author's new collection of short stories

Welcome to the June–July issue of ABR!
Highlights include:

Ferocious grace
Felicity Plunkett on Nick Cave and trauma's aftermath

Calibre Prize: 'Floundering'
Runner-up Sarah Walker's personal essay on pregnancy

Spring is here
Jack Callil on Ali Smith's new novel

Bedlam at Botany Bay
Alan Atkinson on James Dunk's history of New South Wales

#MeToo: A reckoning
Zora Simic on #MeToo, a compilation of essays on the movement

The ABR Favourite Australian Novel poll
Vote now and win one of three great prizes!

 

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More from the current issue

2019 Calibre Essay Prize (runner-up): 'Floundering' by Sarah Walker

Sarah Walker

I swim at night, carving through water full of chlorine and tasting of mould, turning lap after lap before the pool closes down, while cells inside me hurry into being like bubbles under a running tap. The lifeguard stalks along beside the pool watching me. I know he’s trying to get me out, but I can’t stop swimming ...

Michael McGirr reviews King of the Air: The turbulent life of Charles Kingsford Smith by Ann Blainey

Michael McGirr

People spent a lot of time looking for the pioneering aviator Charles Kingsford Smith. When he disappeared for the final time in 1935 just south of Myanmar, then known as Burma, he was just thirty-eight but felt ancient. Hopeful rescuers came from far and wide, but their efforts were not rewarded ...

Dean Biron reviews The Van Apfel Girls are Gone by Felicity McLean

Dean Biron

From the ill-fated explorations of Leichhardt and Burke and Wills through to the Beaumont children, Azaria Chamberlain, and the backpacker murders in New South Wales, the history of Australia is peppered with tales and images of people going missing. And, as the First Peoples might well have been able to warn us, few of those stories turn out well ...

Christina Twomey reviews Contesting Australian History: Essays in honour of Marilyn Lake edited by Joy Damousi and Judith Smart

Christina Twomey

Marilyn Lake is without doubt one of the most influential historians in and of Australia in the last thirty years. ‘SIGN. US. UP’ writes Clare Corbould, one of the contributors to this festschrift, when describing the reaction of her postgraduate self and friends to seeing Lake sweep through the crowd at a history conference in the late 1990s ...

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