June–July 2019, issue no. 412

The $9,000 Peter Porter Poetry Prize
Entries are now open until 1 October 2019
Ferocious grace
Felicity Plunkett on Nick Cave and trauma's aftermath
Calibre Prize: 'Floundering'
Runner-up Sarah Walker's personal essay on pregnancy
#MeToo: A reckoning
Zora Simic on #MeToo, a compilations of essays on the movement
Spring is here
Jack Callil on Ali Smith's new novel
Tell us your Favourite Australian Novel (since 2000)
And be in the running to win great prizes!
Ted Chiang's Exhalation
Lisa Bennett on the author's new collection of short stories

Welcome to the June–July issue of ABR!
Highlights include:

Ferocious grace
Felicity Plunkett on Nick Cave and trauma's aftermath

Calibre Prize: 'Floundering'
Runner-up Sarah Walker's personal essay on pregnancy

Spring is here
Jack Callil on Ali Smith's new novel

Bedlam at Botany Bay
Alan Atkinson on James Dunk's history of New South Wales

#MeToo: A reckoning
Zora Simic on #MeToo, a compilation of essays on the movement

The ABR Favourite Australian Novel poll
Vote now and win one of three great prizes!

 

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