Jan–Feb 2019, issue no. 408

The Calibre Essay Prize closes soon!
We welcome essays of all kinds
Review of the Month
Sarah Holland-Batt on The Letters of Sylvia Plath, Volume II
Publisher Picks
We invited leading editors to nominate their favourite books of 2018
The ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize is open!
$12,500 in prizes • Closes 15 April 2019
Ania Walwicz's horse
Bernard Cohen reviews Ania Walwicz's new work horse
Alan Rusbridger's new memoir
Jane Cadzow reviews Breaking News by Alan Rusbridger
Shaun Tan's Tales from the Inner City
Danielle Clode reviews Shaun Tan's new book.
New one-year subscribers can win an ABR tote bag!
Email us at business@australianbookreview.com.au to find out more

Welcome to the January–February issue of ABR!
Highlights include:

Review of the Month
Sarah Holland-Batt on the last letters of Sylvia Plath.

Publisher Picks
Leading editors including Michael Heyward, Mathilda Imlah, and Aviva Tuffield reveal their favourite books of 2018.

Alan Rusbridger's Breaking News
Jane Cadzow reviews former Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger's new memoir Breaking News.

Shaun Tan's Tales from the Inner City
Danielle Clode reviews Shaun Tan's new book.

Sebastian Smee's Net Loss
Alex Tighe reviews Sebastian Smee's Quarterly Essay Net Loss on the future of our inner lives in a digital age.

A new book on Angels in America
Tim Byrne reviews The World Only Spins Forward by Isaac Butler and Dan Kois.

 

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Sarah Holland-Batt reviews 'The Letters of Sylvia Plath Volume 2: 1956–1963' edited by Peter K. Steinberg and Karen V. Kukil

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