May 2019, issue no. 411

Dollars, pounds, and euros
Kieran Pender on Moneyland by Oliver Bullough
This is the way the world ends
Beejay Silcox on the lure of dystopian fiction
Daniel Halliday on tax justice
And why politicians find it so hard
Ian McEwan's Machines Like Me
Paul Giles reviews the author's latest sci-fi-inspired novel
Nam Le on David Malouf
Peter Rose reviews On David Malouf by Nam Le
'The sound of nothing at all'
Johanna Leggatt on City of Trees by Sophie Cunningham

Welcome to the May issue of ABR!
Highlights include:

Dollars, pounds, and euros
Kieran Pender on Moneyland by Oliver Bullough

'The sound of nothing at all'
Johanna Leggatt on City of Trees by Sophie Cunningham

Nam Le on David Malouf
Peter Rose reviews Nam Le's On David Malouf

This is the way the world ends
Beejay Silcox on dystopian fiction in the age of Trump

Daniel Halliday on tax justice
And why politicians find it so hard

Ian McEwan's Machines Like Me
Paul Giles on McEwan's latest sci-fi-inspired fiction

 

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'Why do politicians find tax justice so hard?' by Daniel Halliday

Daniel Halliday

As part of his budget speech to the House of Representatives in April, Josh Frydenberg, the federal treasurer, announced that his suite of policy changes would ‘deliver better outcomes for all Australians’. Such talk is par for the course in parliamentary democracies ...

'Karen Carpenter', a new poem by Charles Bernstein

Charles Bernstein

Her voice
weeps
sin-
g-
ing
to
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Johanna Leggatt reviews City of Trees: Essays on life, death and the need for a forest by Sophie Cunningham

Johanna Leggatt

When Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird wrote The Secret Life of Plants (1975), many critics labelled their attempt to prove a spiritual link between people and plants as mystical gibberish, with a New York Times review chiding the authors for pandering to charlatans and amateur psychics ...

Peter McPhee reviews Diderot and the Art of Thinking Freely by Andrew S. Curran

Peter McPhee

Andrew S. Curran recounts the only meeting between the two great philosophes Denis Diderot and Voltaire early in 1778 when Diderot, aged sixty-five, insulted Voltaire, then eighty-five, by averring that contemporary playwrights (including, by implication, the two of them) would not brush Shakespeare’s testicles if ... 

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