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September 2019, no. 414

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ABR Arts

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Book of the Week

Politics

How to Defend Australia by Hugh White

Reviewed by

Barely a decade ago, Australia was in the middle of much excitement about the Asian Century. Today, those heady days seem a distant memory. A growing number of pundits see the north as troubled by dangerous flashpoints and great power rivalries. On top of that is an America apparently in strategic retreat from the region ...

Interview

October 2018, no. 405

Chris Feik is Publisher of the Month

ABR: In your dealings with authors, what is the greatest pleasure – and challenge?

The greatest pleasure is helping authors make their work the best version of itself. There is no greatest challenge, I am glad to say, although sometimes expectations need to be ‘managed’.

Interview

April 2018, no. 400

Publisher of the Month with Nathan Hollier

Mostly I plan to write and then console myself I didn’t have time. Having written the odd thing, I have a greater respect for writing as a craft. As a publisher, I try not to pre-judge works written in modes or from a perspective that I don’t personally favour ...

Interview

October 2018, no. 405

Chris Feik is Publisher of the Month

ABR: In your dealings with authors, what is the greatest pleasure – and challenge?

The greatest pleasure is helping authors make their work the best version of itself. There is no greatest challenge, I am glad to say, although sometimes expectations need to be ‘managed’.

From the Archive

October 2005, no. 275

James Ley reviews 'Slow Man' by J.M. Coetzee

Slow Man begins with an accident. Paul Rayment is cycling along an Adelaide street when he is struck by a car. When he emerges from a daze of doctors and painkillers, he discovers his life has been transformed by this random event. His crushed leg is amputated above the knee. From now on, he will ...

From the Archive

May 2004, no. 261

James Bradley reviews 'The White Earth' by Andrew McGahan

‘White’ and ‘earth’ are not words that sit easily together in an Australian context, so much so that placing them thus seems almost deliberately unsettling. Juxtaposed, they only serve to remind us of things that are mostly too hard for us to look at directly, a claim to a possession all know to be ill-founded ...

From the Archive

October 2001, no. 235

Evelyn Juers reviews 'The Feel of Steel' by Helen Garner

Following True Stories, published in 1996, The Feel of Steel is Helen Garner’s second collection of non-fiction. It comprises thirty-one pieces of varying lengths. Longer narratives such as ‘Regions of Thick-Ribbed Ice’, about a hair-raising trip to Antarctica, and ‘A Spy in the House of Excrement’, about the outcome ...

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