ABR Arts

It’s easy to forget how young Edward Albee was when he wrote his first plays, The Zoo Story, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and A Delicate Balance. Perhaps it was his choice of subjects and types that obscured the New Yorker’s precocity. In a way, Albee was always middle-aged – like his great characters (George, Tobias, ...

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Thirty years old is a difficult age for a play in this country. Australian cultural memory is not exactly short, but it certainly tapers in the middle where such plays lie, flanked on one side by The Canon and, on the other, by The Next Big Thing. Andrew Bovell’s After Dinner – initially a melancholic one-acter for three women ...

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The Update - April 10, 2018

Tuesday, 10 April 2018

In this fortnight's Update: Melbourne International Jazz Festival preview by Des Cowley, Clunes Booktown, Nicole Car makes her ACO début, ANU Press launches a record label, Dark Mofo 2018, SSO's Playerlink!, Arts & Minds 2018, Laurie Anderson at HOTA, the Emerging Artist Award 2018, and music and film giveaways ...

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La Bayadère (Queensland Ballet) ★★1/2

Lee Christofis
Monday, 09 April 2018

Marius Petipa’s ballet La Bayadère (The Temple Dancer), written in 1877, could be seen as the grandparent of Bollywood musicals. It has all the ingredients: Solor, a prince who loves Nikiya, a low-caste temple dancer; a conniving Brahmin high priest who lusts after her; Solor’s father, who has promised him to another man’s ...

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After the vast proportions of her 2013 play, Chimerica (seen here in 2017) – a multi-scene, huge-cast exploration of American–Chinese relations – Lucy Kirkwood’s The Children – a one-set, three-character play – might seem like something of a chamber piece. But if it is physically small in scale, thematically it is even more ...

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Although this not-to-be-missed offering from the National Gallery of Victoria has been billed as a ‘two-part exhibition’, it is a much more complex entity than that. In the words of the three lead curators – Cathy Leahy, Judith Ryan, and Susan van Wyck – it ‘explores different perspectives on Australia’s shared history in ...

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The Resistable Rise of Arturo Ui was the final play written in the extraordinarily prolific period of Bertolt Brecht’s Scandinavian exile (1939–41), a period that, among other works, produced the first version of Galileo, The Good Person of Szechwan, Mother Courage, and Herr Puntila and His Man Matti ...

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Xenos (Adelaide Festival) ★★★★

Lee Christofis
Tuesday, 27 March 2018

Last year, Akram Khan, England’s leading Asian dancer–choreographer, stunned the dance world community when he announced he would stop performing in 2018 and that his last show would be Xenos, meaning ‘foreigner’ or ‘stranger’. It premièred at the Onassis Cultural Centre, Athens, on 21 February, and reached ...

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The Update - March 27, 2018

Australian Book Review
Tuesday, 27 March 2018

In this fortnight's Update: Australian Festival of Chamber Music 2018, Behind Closed Doors (CuriousWorks and Screen Australia), The winner of the Cornish Family Prize for Art and Design, Artists take up residence with Black Swan State Theatre Company, Art in Tasmania's Tarkine wilderness, and giveaways from the Art Gallery of New South Wales and Transmission Films.

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The Death of Stalin ★★★1/2

Anwen Crawford
Monday, 26 March 2018

Madnesses pile up in The Death of Stalin, too fast and too numerous to itemise. Victims of tyranny are snatched away in the dead of night, locked in basements, or pushed down staircases at Chaplinesque speed. The terms of engagement change halfway through a conversation: forbidden thoughts are now doctrine ...

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