ABR Arts

1985 ★★★★

Stuart Richards
Wednesday, 24 April 2019

At the 2019 Melbourne Queer Film Festival, a friend and I were discussing the work of the Texan-based, Malaysian-born filmmaker Yen Tan. Having just seen his latest film, 1985, I was struck by the subtle power of the film. Aesthetically, it might have been made in 1985. As with all his films, there is a non-sensationalist sadness that gradually builds ...

... (read more)

The Update - April 23, 2019

ABR Arts
Tuesday, 23 April 2019

In this fortnight's Update: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof  performed by Sydney Theatre Company; submissions open for fortyfivedownstair's Emerging Artist Award 2019; the ABR 2020 European tour; Vicki Laveau-Harvie wins the $50,000 Stella Prize 2019; applications open for The Australian/Vogel’s Literary Award; the 14th Stonnington Jazz Festival; Slaughterhouse Five reimagined by Theatre Works; The Secret River to tour UK; and more ...

... (read more)

Mosquitoes (Sydney Theatre Company) ★★★★

Ian Dickson
Monday, 15 April 2019

With impeccable timing, the week the National Science Foundation published the first picture of a black hole, Sydney Theatre Company opened its production of Mosquitoes, Lucy Kirkwood’s exploration of the gulf between supposedly rational scientific knowledge and the vagaries of the human heart. Kirkwood has never been afraid of confronting big themes ...

... (read more)

Burning ★★★★★

Richard Leathem
Friday, 12 April 2019

Japanese author Haruki Murakami may be one of the most revered authors alive, but his work is seldom adapted for the screen, erhaps because the internalised nature of his narratives doesn’t leap out as being easily translated to film. Until now, only Norwegian Wood (2010), an atypical Murakami novel, has seen wide exposure ...

... (read more)

West Side Story (Opera Australia) ★★★

Peter Tregear
Wednesday, 10 April 2019

Some sixty-two years after its Broadway première, Leonard Bernstein and Jerome Robbins’s musical and geographical updating of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet continues to pack a powerful dramatic punch. While not without its weaknesses, such as the reliance on now-dated street slang and ethnic stereotypes ...

... (read more)

Us ★★★★

Barnaby Smith
Thursday, 28 March 2019

Popular culture is still resonating with the impact of Jordan Peele’s 2017 film Get Out, one of the most extraordinary and confident directorial débuts of recent times. Get Out cut a swath through complacency and assumptions regarding race relations. The idea of wealthy, ageing white people transplanting their brains into the bodies of young black men to ...

... (read more)

Update - March 26, 2019

ABR Arts
Tuesday, 26 March 2019

In this fortnight's Update: the Sydney Writers’ Festival program launch, the $20,000 WA Fogarty Literary Award, the First Nations Fellowship for First Nations Writers announced, the KYD Mentorship Program, and more!

... (read more)

The traditional Western art museum is struggling a bit. Its former role as a repository of national values, as reified and aestheticised in paintings, sculpture, and the decorative arts, is today challenged if not assaulted on multiple fronts: ranging from economic, political, and social globalisation, to digital technology ...

... (read more)

In the program note for his most recent play, Belfast playwright David Ireland claims that ‘he became a playwright after being unemployed and unemployable as an actor for three years, despite having trained as an actor for three years at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama ... 

... (read more)

The plays of William Shakespeare have the dubious honour of being the most reinvented, reimagined, dressed-up, dumbed-down, and generally meddled-with works ever staged. To a less prolific extent, the same is true of the Classical canon of ancient Greece. In unskilled hands, countless injustices have been ...

... (read more)
Page 4 of 58