Society

John Funder reviews 'We’re all going to die' by Leah Kaminsky

John Funder

Good general practice is the cornerstone of a good healthcare system: Australia is blessed with both. Leah Kaminsky has been a Melbourne general practitioner for three decades and by her own explicit admission wrote We’re All Going to Die as a way to address her own fear of death. Her beloved mother was ‘the only leaf left dangling from her charred fami ... More

Angelo Loukakis reviews 'A Single Tree: Voices from the bush' compiled by Don Watson

Angelo Loukakis

In The Bush (2014), Don Watson explored notions of what that most variegated of terms, ‘the bush’, meant to earlier generations, including his own family. In ...

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Anna MacDonald reviews 'Flâneuse: Women walk the city in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London' by Lauren Elkin

Anna MacDonald

As we step out of the house,’ writes Virginia Woolf, in her 1927 essay ‘Street Haunting’, ‘we shed the self our friends know us by and become part of that vast republican army of . More

Brian Matthews reviews 'City Dreamers: The urban imagination in Australia' by Graeme Davison

Brian Matthews

In The Oxford Companion to Australian History, of which he was a co-editor with John Hirst and Stuart Macintyre, Graeme Davison begins his essay on Geoffrey Blainey by saluting hi More

Maria O’Sullivan reviews 'Not Quite Australian: How temporary migration is changing the nation' by Peter Mares

Maria O'Sullivan

Migration is widely regarded as one of the most important policy issues on the global agenda. Not only does it have economic implications for states, it also poses certain challenges for . More

Renata Singer reviews 'Advanced Australia: The politics of ageing' by Mark Butler

Even before I'd finished talking, hands shot up from the grey heads in the audience. 'I'm very concerned,' said the jowly chap with the sailor's suntan, 'that advances ...

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Ilana Snyder reviews 'Older and Bolder' by Renata Singer

Ilana Snyder

In 1971, the Boston Women's Health Collective published Our Bodies, Ourselves, which became an international phenomenon and was translated into twenty-nine languages. For second wave feminists, taking control of their lives and their bodies was a basic principle. The book provided information related to sexuality, birth control, abortion, pregnancy and chil ... More

Claudio Bozzi reviews 'The Italians' by John Hooper

Claudio Bozzi

The Economist’s foreign correspondent John Hooper turns to a quintessentially English theme: Italians. Italians seem to be a sort of recurring obsession, a presence that periodically intrudes into the English imaginary. The cultural construction of Italy is a particularly sensitive and timely topic in the context of debates about the future of Europe. The a ... More

Simon Tormey reviews 'To Save Everything, Click Here' by Evgeny Morozov

Simon Tormey

What are the implications of the ever-accelerating revolution in information communication technology on our lives? Is the Internet a force for good, for increased freedom and democracy? Or are we so in thrall to the prophets of Silicon Valley that we have lost sight of the perils that lie in ‘big data’, the extension of algorithms and quantification into every ... More

Reading Australia: 'The Female Eunuch' by Germaine Greer

Miriam Cosic

When Germaine Greer’s The Female Eunuch was published in 1970, it created a sensation. Within six months, it had almost sold out its second print run and had been translated into eight languages. Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex, the influence of which critics see in Greer’s book, had come out in France in 1949. The Feminine Mystique, b ... More

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