Fiction

Beejay Silcox reviews 'Warlight' by Michael Ondaatje

Beejay Silcox
25 June 2018

In a cheerless London basement, a young man sifts through the bureaucratic detritus of World War II: ‘to unearth whatever evidence might still remain of actions that history might consid More

Joachim Redner reviews 'Berlin Alexanderplatz' by Alfred Döblin, translated by Michael Hofmann

Joachim Redner
24 May 2018

Revered in Germany as one of the founders of literary modernism, the equal of Robert Musil and Thomas Mann, Alfred Döblin (1878–1957) has remained something of a mystery to English read More

Carol Middleton reviews 'The Bridge' by Enza Gandolfo

Carol Middleton
24 May 2018

‘Accidents happen.’ In the aftermath of a fatal car accident, one of two accidents that frame the narrative of The Bridge, these words are tossed up in the turbulent minds of More

Geordie Williamson reviews 'Last Stories' by William Trevor

Geordie Williamson
24 May 2018

‘In nearly all Trevor’s stories,’ wrote V.S. Pritchett almost four decades ago, ‘we are led on at first by plain unpretending words about things done to prosaic people; then comes More

Beejay Silcox reviews 'Census' by Jesse Ball

Beejay Silcox
24 May 2018

You have come to see a magic show. You arrive at the theatre, take your seat. Before the show begins, the magician steps onstage in his street clothes and explains what you are about to se More

Fiona Wright reviews 'Bohemia Beach' by Justine Ettler

Fiona Wright
24 May 2018

Bohemia Beach is a highly anticipated novel – the first work by Justine Ettler in twenty years. In many ways, it is a continuation of her oeuvre: a fast-paced, almost madcap tal More

Robert Dessaix reviews 'The Friendly Ones' by Philip Hensher

Robert Dessaix
24 May 2018

‘Nothing matters very much,’ says Hilary Spinster, one of the main characters in Philip Hensher’s mammoth mêlée of a novel, ‘and most things don’t matter at all’. How true, w More

Anna MacDonald reviews 'The Fortress' by S.A. Jones

Anna MacDonald
26 April 2018

This speculative novel is of the Zeitgeist. S.A. Jones imagines a civilisation of women – the Vaik – committed to ‘Work. History. Sex. Justice.’ Although they live apart, in ‘The More

Gretchen Shirm reviews 'You Belong Here' by Laurie Steed

Gretchen Shirm
26 April 2018

Interwoven short story collections are often at their best when they offer multiple perspectives on the same event. Laurie Steed does this well in his début novel You Belong Here More

Josephine Taylor reviews 'The Lucky Galah' by Tracy Sorensen

Josephine Taylor
26 April 2018

In 1969, in a quintessentially Australian town on the remote north-west coast, the locals prepare to celebrate their role in the moon landing. In 2000, as the townsfolk brace themselves fo More

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