Poetry

Geoffrey Lehmann on Chris Wallace-Crabbe's new and selected verse

Geoffrey Lehmann
25 March 2013

First, I will bore you with some Chris Wallace-Crabbe statistics. Born in 1934, he has thirty-three ‘new’ poems in his New and Selected Poems, which is an average of about seven poems a year since his last volume, Telling a Hawk from a Handsaw (2008). That is a lot of poems for the second half of a poet’s eighth decade, a time when many run ... More

Mike Ladd reviews Geoff Page's '1953'

Mike Ladd
08 March 2013

Geoff Page’s 1953 is set in the town of Eurandangee, which, we learn, is about 650 kilometres north-west of Sydney. There are other locators:

the river, with its governor’s name,
reduced now to a string of pools,

uncertain where to go;
a double shine of railway line
tracking in and stoppi ... More

Gig Ryan reviews 'Lime Green Chair'

Gig Ryan
07 March 2013

Lime Green Chair, which is Chris Andrews’s second book, won in manuscript form the Anthony Hecht 2011 Poetry Prize. Andrews is also a prize-winning translator from the Spanish of Roberto Bolaño, César Aira, and others. Lime Green Chair translates and transforms everyday moments into auguries of time disappearing. Each of these mo ... More

David McCooey reviews 'On Poetry'

David McCooey
28 January 2013

‘T his is a book for anyone,’ begins On Poetry, bythe English poet Glyn Maxwell. It is a bold gesture, returning an ancient art to ‘anyone’ interested in it. Inasmuch as any book can be for everyone, On Poetry is such a book. It is funny, original, and doesn’t presuppose expertise on the part of the reader. It is the best book on reading and ... More

Kate Middleton reviews 'Liquid Nitrogen'

Kate Middleton
28 January 2013

Jennifer Maiden has for a long time been one of Australia’s most politically engaged poets, a commentator on the local scene and the international set alike. With her new volume, Liquid Nitrogen, Maiden continues on from her previous books Friendly Fire (2005) and Pirate Rain (2010), with more poems centred on the journalist George Jeffreys, a ... More

Stephen Edgar reviews Poetry Magazine's 'The Open Door'

Stephen Edgar
27 January 2013

‘Reading through a hundred years of Poetry, week after week of issue after issue after issue, some forty thousand poems in all, Don and I, when we weren’t rendered prone and moaning, jolted back and forth between elation and depression.’ So Christian Wiman writes in his introduction to this elating, and never depressing, new anthology celebrating one hu ... More

Mike Ladd reviews 'Available Light'

Mike Ladd
27 January 2013

Facing the first poem in Graeme Kinross-Smith’s new book Available Light is a quote from Margaret Atwood’s Negotiating with the Dead (2002): ‘The mere act of writing splits the self in two.’ When you write, not only are you a writer, but you are your own first and very present reader. Suddenly, all alone at your desk, you have company. The firs ... More

Peter Kenneally reviews 'Prepare the Cabin for Landing'

Peter Kenneally
26 January 2013

In Alan Wearne’s new collection, his not-quite-self-appointed role as chronicler of Australian mora et tempores continues, more overtly than before. Prepare the Cabin for Landing pays homage to the Roman satirist Juvenal and his eighteenth-century heir, Samuel Johnson. Both shared what Wearne describes as ‘that combination of bemusement, annoyance, ... More

Anthony Lynch on Brook Emery's 'Collusion'

Anthony Lynch
27 November 2012

Brook Emery’s opening poem in Collusion is addressed to ‘Dear K’, an address reprised in the last, movingly lyrical poem in this his fourth collection. We might read the intervening poems as a correspondence with ‘K’, this other who halfway through the collection is referred to as ‘my interlocutor, my conscience’. Emery cleverly anticipates and ... More

Geoffrey Lehmann on 'London: A History in Verse'

Geoffrey Lehmann
24 November 2012

For the poet W.S. Graham, running away from Scotland ‘with my money belt of Northern ice’ at the age of nineteen, London was the ‘golden city’ in his poem ‘The Night City’. Graham ‘found Eliot and he said yes // And sprang into a Holmes cab. / Boswell passed me in the fog / Going to visit Whistler who / Was with John Donne …’ For other poets in thi ... More

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