Arts – Visual Arts

‘Iron in the mind’

Angus Trumble

 

Out of Australia: Prints and Drawings from Sidney Nolan to Rover Thomas
by Stephen Coppel
British Museum, £25 pb, 240 pp, 9780714126722

 

The British Museum’s connection with Australia goes right back to 29 Apri ...

Triumphalist march on St Kilda Road

Robert Aldrich

 

Napoleon: Revolution to Empire
edited by Ted Gott
National Gallery of Victoria, $49.95 hb, 327 pp, 9780724103560

 

Napoleon came to power as First Consul in 1799 after a coup d’état, having recentl ...

In 1981, William Kentridge journeyed from apartheid South Africa to the École Jacques Lecoq in Paris, renowned for its work in improvisation and physical theatre – theatre that creates itself in play. Though Kentridge would become an artist – working in drawing, printing, animation, film, opera, and sculpture – physical theatre and improvisation come closest ...

Life-of-PWTo Canberra on 12 April for the opening of a new travelling exhibition, The Life of Patrick White.

First, though, a quick dash that morning to Sydney for a meeting with Bernadette Brennan and Hilary McPhee. The three of us hav ...

Lightness and clarity

by Christopher Menz

 

The initial idea was for a new front door at the National Gallery of Australia. At least that is how Ron Radford, director of the Gallery, presented it to the one thousand or so guests in his remarks at the official opening of Andrew Andersons’ and PTW Architects’ Stage One ‘New Look ...

The late Susan Sontag suggested that the photograph ‘offers a modern counterpart of that characteristically romantic architectural genre, the artificial ruin: the ruin which is created in order to deepen the historical character of a landscape, to make nature suggestive, suggestive of the past’. On viewing the retrospective exhibition Bill Henson: Three Decades of Photography, which was organised by the Art Gallery of New South Wales and is now at The Ian Potter Centre: National Gallery of Victoria Australia (NGVA), this familiar idea of the photograph as memento mori struck me as peculiarly apposite. Although the experience of Henson’s photographs is not quite the eighteenth-century one of sighing over ruins, the tone of the exhibition is distinctly melancholic, something like a syncopated elegy in pictures.

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