Found in Translation: Design in California and Mexico, 1915–1985 (Los Angeles County Museum of Art)

Reviewed by
ABR Arts

Found in Translation: Design in California and Mexico, 1915–1985 (Los Angeles County Museum of Art)

Reviewed by
ABR Arts

Translation can be an art or a craft; seldom simple, it is often unappreciated. We tend to forget that the global community of ceaseless interconnectivity could not exist without translation, or bilingualism. Without translation there is Babel, but with its quiet, endless grinding, translation brings down walls and creates porous cultures that cannot help but influence one another.

The current exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Found in Translation: Design in California and Mexico, 1915–1985, ponders this theme. The exhibition features more than 250 items, a combination of crafts, photographs, films, and posters. It explores the dialogue of mutual influence in architecture and design between Mexico and California. There are four main themes: Spanish Colonial Inspiration, Pre-Hispanic Revivals, Folk Art and Craft Traditions, and Modernism.

From the New Issue

You May Also Like

Leave a comment

Please note that all comments must be approved by ABR and comply with our Terms & Conditions.

NB: If you are an ABR Online subscriber or contributor, you will need to login to ABR Online in order to post a comment. If you have forgotten your login details, or if you receive an error message when trying to submit your comment, please email your comment (and the name of the article to which it relates) to ABR Comments. We will review your comment and, subject to approval, we will post it under your name.