ABR Arts

Napoleon rules at the NGV

Robert Aldrich
Tuesday, 10 July 2012

Triumphalist march on St Kilda Road

Robert Aldrich

 

Napoleon: Revolution to Empire
edited by Ted Gott
National Gallery of Victoria, $49.95 hb, 327 pp, 9780724103560

 

Napoleon came to power as First Consul in 1799 after a coup d’état, having recentl ...

Trishna

Philippa Hawker
Wednesday, 23 May 2012

Choosing to set a screen adaptation of Tess of the d’Urbervilles (1891) in contemporary India might seem like an almost perverse shift, or an over-determining decision. But for British film-maker Michael Winterbottom, there is consistency and history of a sort. It is his third Thomas Hardy adaptation, and his fourth feature shot on the subcontinent. In re ...

Summer of the Seventeenth Doll

John Rickard
Monday, 27 February 2012

I first saw Summer of the Seventeenth Doll in 1957 in London, of all places. I remember feeling some pride in seeing the symbolic kewpie doll presiding over the New Theatre in the heart of the West End. June Jago’s performance as Olive has stayed with me over the years; Philip Hope-Wallace, the Guardian reviewer, described her as ‘all chin and ...

Carnage

Jake Wilson
Monday, 27 February 2012

‘There is such and such a relationship between a man and a woman. They are living in such and such a place. And here come the intruders.’ So Roman Polanski, interviewed in 1969, described the conception of Cul de Sac (1966), his favourite among his films.

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The fifty-seventh summer of Ray Lawler’s great play

John Rickard
Wednesday, 01 February 2012

‘This harsh, cawing, strongly felt play’

by John Rickard

 

 

I first saw Summer of the Seventeenth Doll in 1957 in London, of all places. I remember feeling some pride in seeing the symbolic kewpie doll presiding over the New Theatre in the heart of the West End. June Jago’s performance as Olive has stayed ...

The Tall Man

Jake Wilson
Thursday, 24 November 2011

One morning in 2004, an Aboriginal man named Cameron Doomadgee was arrested for swearing at a police officer; forty-five minutes later he lay dead on the floor of his cell. Something had gone badly wrong, though the white senior sergeant on duty, the towering Chris Hurley, denied he was in any way at fault.

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Lightness and clarity

by Christopher Menz

 

The initial idea was for a new front door at the National Gallery of Australia. At least that is how Ron Radford, director of the Gallery, presented it to the one thousand or so guests in his remarks at the official opening of Andrew Andersons’ and PTW Architects’ Stage One ‘New Look ...

Peter Rose reviews 'The Eye of the Storm'

Peter Rose
Tuesday, 27 September 2011

So Patrick White’s most flamboyant novel (with the possible exception of The Twyborn Affair) has been brought to the cinema, after the usual longueurs and fiscal frights. Director Fred Schepisi and his scriptwriter, Judy Morris, have tamed the long and somewhat unwieldy beast that won White the Nobel Prize in 1973. Lovers of the novel will miss certain sc ...

Cloudstreet

Brian McFarlane
Monday, 23 May 2011

Whereas the miniseries, most often based on revered literary texts, has been a staple of British television for fifty years, I could count on the fingers of a dismembered hand its Australian counterparts. In fact, the miniseries in general, as distinct from serials that run for a longer or shorter ...

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Different readings at the Melbourne International Arts Festival

by John Rickard

 

In October, Brett Sheehy’s Melbourne International Arts Festival presented, with a certain relish, I suspect, two productions that represent opposite ends of a dramatic spectrum of current concern to those working in theatre. Heiner Goebbels’s S ...