A View from the Bridge (Melbourne Theatre Company)

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Maxim Boon Monday, 18 March 2019
Published in ABR Arts

The plays of William Shakespeare have the dubious honour of being the most reinvented, reimagined, dressed-up, dumbed-down, and generally meddled-with works ever staged. To a less prolific extent, the same is true of the Classical canon of ancient Greece. In unskilled hands, countless injustices have been inflicted on these texts by pretentious or gimmicky interpretations. And yet, with a theatre-maker of vision at the helm, these plays still have fresh truths and unseen revelations to share, hundreds or even thousands of years after their conception.

It seems telling that the most potent muses of Arthur Miller – that titan of American theatre – were the Greek Classics and the Bard. Miller’s plays seem to have centuries of discoveries hidden within them, all waiting to be unlocked by visionary directors.

In his stark and streamlined production of A View from the Bridge (1955), Iain Sinclair demonstrates this in action. Though less cherished than his two most famous plays, Death of a Salesman (1949) and The Crucible (1953), it may well be the work that most succinctly epitomises Miller’s creative inspirations, making explicit connections to the Classical masterworks he so revered. Indeed, the first iteration of this twentieth-century Greek tragedy was penned as a verse epic. (Responding to a decidedly tepid reception, Miller later revised into its current, more conventional form.)

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Maxim Boon

Maxim Boon

Maxim Boon is an arts and culture writer and editor based in Melbourne. He is the Senior Group Editor and National Arts Editor of Street Press magazine The Music, and formerly the Online Editor of Limelight Magazine. He is the new classical music critic for The Age.

Maxim studied composition and conducting at the Royal Academy of Music in London before beginning a career in teaching, followed by several years as an arts publicist, producer, and freelance writer, largely working across dance and opera; his pathway into the world of journalism has been a winding one. But it has also been hugely formative, exposing him to wide range of art forms reflected in the broad range of topics he now covers.

Since relocating to Australia in 2014 from his native United Kingdom to become a full-time writer and editor, he has used this eclectic background to explore arts, entertainment, and culture stories over a spectrum of disciplines, from classical music to stand-up comedy, streaming TV to immersive theatre, tattooing to fashion design, opera to popera, and more or less everything in between.

Maxim also writes extensively about the LGBTQ community, queer culture, and politics.

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