ABR Arts

ABR Arts’s long day’s journey into operatic night continued with three familiar productions, one of them new to the Metropolitan Opera. Jules Massenet’s fifteenth opera (April 24) is largely unknown to modern audiences, but its neglect is a mystery, for this version of Charles Perrault’s 1697 fairy tale (based on a libretto ...

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Breath ★★★★

Brian McFarlane
Tuesday, 01 May 2018

In Simon Baker’s film, there is a visually stunning moment – one among many – of a giant curving wave on the verge of breaking that recalls the Japanese artist Hokusai’s famous ‘The Great Wave of Kanagawa’. What these two images share is the sense of rapturous beauty that doesn’t underestimate the challenge it offers ...

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In the introduction to her seminal memoir of life as a transgender person, Conundrum (1974), the author Jan Morris makes it clear that she is not concerned with merely narrating the facts of her condition. ‘What was important’ to relate ‘was the liberty of us all to live as we wished to live, to love however we wanted to love ...

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Così fan tutte (Metropolitan Opera) ★★★★

Peter Rose
Thursday, 26 April 2018

‘When you’re young, you believe everything,’ Jonas Kaufmann muses in Thomas Voigt’s biographical study, In Conversation with Jonas Kaufmann (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2017). The German tenor, a frequent Ferrando at the start of his career, went on: ‘And now imagine: two couples who live next door to each other go ...

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The Update - April 24, 2018

ABR Arts
Tuesday, 24 April 2018

In this fortnight's Update: Summer of the Seventeenth Doll, MCA Zine Fair, Wu Tong at AFCM 2018, Kendrick Lamar, Conductor Laureate Andrew Davis, Natasha Cica resigns as Heide CEO and Director, and giveaways from Black Swan State Theatre Company and Roadshow films ...

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Loveless ★★★★

Anwen Crawford
Monday, 23 April 2018

Andrey Zvyagintsev’s Loveless is a cold, despairing film, befitting its title. It opens and closes in the depths of winter, with wide, lingering shots of an ice-bound river; in between, it delivers a portrait of a marriage that has hardened into estrangement, with a child lost to the void that exists between his parents. No character ...

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It’s easy to forget how young Edward Albee was when he wrote his first plays, The Zoo Story, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and A Delicate Balance. Perhaps it was his choice of subjects and types that obscured the New Yorker’s precocity. In a way, Albee was always middle-aged – like his great characters (George, Tobias, ...

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Thirty years old is a difficult age for a play in this country. Australian cultural memory is not exactly short, but it certainly tapers in the middle where such plays lie, flanked on one side by The Canon and, on the other, by The Next Big Thing. Andrew Bovell’s After Dinner – initially a melancholic one-acter for three women ...

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The Update - April 10, 2018

Tuesday, 10 April 2018

In this fortnight's Update: Melbourne International Jazz Festival preview by Des Cowley, Clunes Booktown, Nicole Car makes her ACO début, ANU Press launches a record label, Dark Mofo 2018, SSO's Playerlink!, Arts & Minds 2018, Laurie Anderson at HOTA, the Emerging Artist Award 2018, and music and film giveaways ...

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La Bayadère (Queensland Ballet) ★★1/2

Lee Christofis
Monday, 09 April 2018

Marius Petipa’s ballet La Bayadère (The Temple Dancer), written in 1877, could be seen as the grandparent of Bollywood musicals. It has all the ingredients: Solor, a prince who loves Nikiya, a low-caste temple dancer; a conniving Brahmin high priest who lusts after her; Solor’s father, who has promised him to another man’s ...

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