Tim Winton

Peter Craven reviews 'The Boy Behind the Curtain' by Tim Winton

Peter Craven
Wednesday, 23 November 2016

Everybody thinks they know about Tim Winton: the working-class hero from the West; the whale of a man who’s been writing since he was a boy; the master of one of ...

... (read more)

Letters to the Editor - December 2016

Wednesday, 23 November 2016

Dear Editor, I’m pleased that Peter Craven found so much to enjoy in The Boy behind the Curtain (ABR, December 2016). Winton always writes good – though somewhat deliberate ...

... (read more)

Cloudstreet (State Opera of South Australia) ★★★★1/2

Michael Halliwell
Monday, 16 May 2016

If any contemporary Australian novel can be said to be canonical, or perhaps even 'the great Australian novel', then it must be Tim Winton's Cloudstreet. Published in 1991, it soon acquired a devoted following and elevated Winton into the top rank of Australian writers ...

... (read more)

Brian Matthews reviews 'Island Home' by Tim Winton

Brian Matthews
Monday, 26 October 2015

Tim Winton's island home seethes and rings, whispers and beckons with sheer life. It tantalises through shreds of memories and phantom histories turned to stone or engraved in ocean-scored rocks and remote caves. Like William Blake's 'green and pleasant land', it is compromised but offers 'a World in a grain of sand / And a Heaven in a wild flower'. His isle, like P ...

Peter Rose reviews 'The Riders' (Victorian Opera)

Peter Rose
Wednesday, 24 September 2014

Here is a fine new Australian opera from Victorian Opera. Composer Iain Grandage and librettist Alison Croggon have taken Tim Winton’s Booker-shortlisted novel The Riders (1994) and created a highly expressive work. Marion Potts directs it on a wide but stark stage furnished only with wooden saw horses. There is a balcony and a revolve, but mostly Potts cho ...

Open Page with Tim Winton

Australian Book Review
Thursday, 31 October 2013

I tend to reread The Sun Also Rises every year, if only to remind myself of what it was like to be eighteen or nineteen and overcome by the initial excitement, the shock, of something fresh and distinctive.

... (read more)

Brian Matthews reviews 'Eyrie' by Tim Winton

Brian Matthews
Wednesday, 30 October 2013

In a notable month for major new Australian fiction, Tim Winton’s Eyrie stands out. Brian Matthews reviews this darkly funny novel – ‘a scarifying assessment of the way we live now’

... (read more)
Page 2 of 2