Media

Gillian Terzis reviews 'The New Front Page' by Tim Dunlop

Gillian Terzis
19 September 2013

Ten years ago, if you moved in certain journalistic circles, calling yourself a blogger was about as popular as leprosy. Few in the industry had respect for the platform, and fewer s More

Ruth Starke's essay: 'Media Don'

Ruth Starke
26 February 2013

It is a hot gusty day in the summer of 1958, the sort of day that melts the tar on the road and brings the red dust down from the north. In the inner-city Adelaide suburb of Norwood, Mario Feleppa, twenty-eight and not long arrived in Australia, is fed up. Not with the heat – he is used to heat back in Italy – but with horses. Specifically, the horses that ... More

Joel Deane reviews 'Murdoch’s Pirates'

Joel Deane
01 February 2013

Talk about unfortunate timing. On 10 December 2012, the New Yorker ran a lengthy profile on Elisabeth Murdoch, the older sister of Lachlan and James. Elisabeth, forty-four, lives in Britain, where – while her siblings have been marked down for everything from, in Lachlan’s case, One.Tel to Ten Network and, in James’s ... More

Gillian Dooley reviews 'Honestly: Notes on Life' by Nikki Gemmell

Gillian Dooley
30 January 2013

The skills involved in writing successful novels are rather different from those needed for a weekly newspaper column. In a column, a thousand words must engage the reader, week in week out, whether or not the writer has anything urgent to say. A short deadline is less forgiving, allowing scant time for polishing and self-editing. On the other hand, stylistic idiosy ... More

Anne Chisolm on the humiliation of Rupert Murdoch

Anne Chisolm
10 July 2012

It all began with Prince William’s knee. Not, of course, the phone hacking and bribery and corruption which, as we all now know, was commonplace behaviour in the British tabloid newspapers at the heart of Rupert Murdoch’s media empire – that had been going on for far longer. But when, in November 2005, the News of the World carried a trivial story abo ... More

Nick Hordern reviews 'Class Act: A Life of Creighton Burns' by John Tidey

Nicholas Hordern
24 April 2012

Newspapers, they say, are in the throes of ‘far-reaching structural change’, a euphemism for ‘extinction’ that arouses complacency in the breasts of the e-literate; fury in those of the technophobes. But one only has to take a slightly longer view to realise that the golden age of newspapers, over which Creighton Burns presided as editor of TheA ... More

Joel Deane: David McKnight's depiction of Rupert Murdoch

Joel Deane
27 February 2012

 It is a thought-provoking photograph. In 1988, during the bicentenary of The Times, Rupert Murdoch and Queen Elizabeth are pictured sitting at a news conference within the inner sanctum of the London broadsheet. Mogul and monarch are at arm’s length – she, straight-backed, legs crossed, hands gathered together above her lap; he, leaning forward an ... More

Robert Phiddian reviews 'Bad News: Murdoch’s Australian and the Shaping of the Nation' by Robert Manne

Robert Phiddian
25 October 2011

Were I Editor in Chief of The Australian for a day, the first thing I would do is can the ‘Cut and Paste’ section on the Letters page. Its schoolyard bullying of the fools and knaves idiotic enough to oppose the paper’s line – usual suspects include Fairfax journalists, the ABC, Greens politicians, Tim Flannery, and Robert Manne – lies at the hear ... More

Jeff Sparrow reviews 'Come the Revolution' by Alex Mitchell

Jeff Sparrow
21 October 2011

In 1963, ASIO opened a file on a disreputable fellow named Laurie Oakes, who was then living with Alex Mitchell, another Daily Mirror reporter. The two men came to the spooks’ a More

Gideon Haigh reviews 'Sideshow: Dumbing down democracy' by Lindsay Tanner

Gideon Haigh
24 May 2011

Bill Clinton discouraged politicians from picking fights with people who bought their ink by the barrel. Mindful of that advice, Lindsay Tanner has waited until the end of a career dedicat More

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