Fallen Among Reformers: Miles Franklin, modernity and the New Woman by Janet Lee

Reviewed by
September 2020, no. 424
Buy this book
Susan Sheridan reviews 'Fallen Among Reformers: Miles Franklin, modernity and the New Woman' by Janet Lee

Fallen Among Reformers: Miles Franklin, modernity and the New Woman

by Janet Lee

Sydney University Press, $45 pb, 196 pp

Buy this book

Fallen Among Reformers: Miles Franklin, modernity and the New Woman by Janet Lee

Reviewed by
September 2020, no. 424

After My Brilliant Career appeared in 1901, Miles Franklin spent a few years living in Sydney, where she enjoyed being fêted as a new literary sensation. Her attempt to earn a living by writing fiction and journalism about women’s issues was less than successful; even the timely and witty suffrage novel, Some Everyday Folk and Dawn (1909), was knocked back at first. In 1906, at the age of twenty-six, she left Australia for the United States. She spent the next nine years living in Chicago and working for the Women’s Trade Union League, secretary to its wealthy patron, Margaret Dreier Robins, and editing its journal, Life and Labour, with her compatriot Alice Henry. The two Australians enjoyed recognition as enfranchised women, a status that American women were still fighting for.

Susan Sheridan reviews 'Fallen Among Reformers: Miles Franklin, modernity and the New Woman' by Janet Lee

Fallen Among Reformers: Miles Franklin, modernity and the New Woman

by Janet Lee

Sydney University Press, $45 pb, 196 pp

From the New Issue

You May Also Like

Leave a comment

If you are an ABR subscriber, you will need to sign in to post a comment.

If you have forgotten your sign in details, or if you receive an error message when trying to submit your comment, please email your comment (and the name of the article to which it relates) to ABR Comments. We will review your comment and, subject to approval, we will post it under your name.

Please note that all comments must be approved by ABR and comply with our Terms & Conditions.