Competitions and programs (94)

2016 Porter Prize Judges

31 July 2015 Written by Amy Baillieu

Luke Davies pic smaller

Luke Davies is a poet, novelist, and screenplay writer. His first collection, Four Plots for Magnets, appeared in 1982, when he was twenty. His novel Candy (1997) was successfully filmed in 2006. He has won many awards, including the Grace Leven Prize for Poetry, the Philip Hodgins Memorial Medal, the Queensland Premier’s Literary Awards Judith Wright Prize, and the Age Book of the Year. His book Interferon Psalms won the inaugural Prime Minister’s Literary Award for poetry in 2012.

 

 

lisa gorton300hLisa Gorton, who lives in Melbourne, became ABR’s Poetry Editor in October 2013. She studied at the Universities of Melbourne and Oxford. A Rhodes Scholar, she completed a Masters in Renaissance Literature and a Doctorate on John Donne at Oxford University. Her first poetry collection, Press Release (2007), won the Victorian Premier’s Prize for Poetry. Her 2013 poetry collection Hotel Hyperion (also Giramondo) was shortlisted for the Queensland Literary Awards. She was editor of The Best Australian Poems 2013 (Black Inc.). Her latest novel, The Life of Houses, was published in 2015.

 

Kate Middleton - new smaller

Kate Middleton is an Australian writer. She is the author of the poetry collections Fire Season (Giramondo, 2009), awarded the Western Australian Premier’s Award for Poetry in 2009 and Ephemeral Waters (Giramondo, 2013), shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s award in 2014. From September 2011-September 2012 she was the inaugural Sydney City Poet.

The Peter Porter Poetry Prize

31 July 2015 Written by Hidden Author

The Peter Porter Poetry Prize is one of Australia’s most prestigious prizes for a new poem. The Prize – open to all poets writing in English – is named after the great Australian poet Peter Porter (1929–2010). The Prize was first awarded in 2005 (Stephen Edgar) and was renamed in 2011, following Peter Porter’s death. Past winners include Tracy Ryan, Judith Bishop, and Anthony Lawrence.

Entries for the next Peter Porter Poetry Prize will open in July 2022.


Please read our Frequently Asked Questions page before contacting us with queries about the Porter Prize.

Click here for more information about past winners and to read their poems.

Peter Porter portrait 1

We gratefully acknowledge the long-standing support of Morag Fraser AM and Andrew Taylor AM.

2015 winner

23 June 2015 Written by Hidden Author

Sophie with textSophie Cunningham‘Staying with the trouble’ covers very different terrain from that of Martin Thomas’s and Christine Piper’s celebrated Calibre-winning essays: ‘“Because it’s your country”: Bringing Back the Bones to West Arnhem Land’ (2013) and ‘Unearthing the Past’ (2014), which dealt with historical wrongs and biological horrors, respectively. In her essay, Sophie Cunningham describes an epic walk up Broadway in New York, and others like it. The tone is self-deprecating, conversational, and ‘gloriously social’, but all sorts of themes arise along the way: Alzheimer’s, Horseshoe Crabs, history, writers, violence against women, racism, Selma, and climate change. It is a celebration of ‘randomness’, but also testifies to Sophie Cunningham’s belief in the importance of ‘staying with the trouble’.

On learning that she had won the Calibre Prize, Sophie Cunningham, who recently moved from Brooklyn to San Francisco, told Advances: 'I wrote this essay with no expectations, from a concern with how one narrates the personal and fragmented while chronicling issues as broad as climate change and mass extinction. I had become obsessed with walking and needed a deadline. The Calibre Prize has rewarded a rich variety of writers who have tackled an extraordinary range of topics. Each year I’ve read the winner and been inspired. I feel incredibly honoured to now be among these winners’ number.’ 

This is the ninth time that ABR has offered the Calibre Prize, which is intended to advance the essay form in this country. We look forward to offering Calibre again in 2016.

Sophie Cunningham’s winning essay is published in the May 2015 issue of ABR.

pdfClick here to download the media release.

Purchase the May 2015 print edition.

Subscribe to ABR Online to gain access to this issue online, plus the ABR archive (containing all Calibre Prize essays published from 2011).

Click here for more information about past winners.

Click here for more information about the judges.

We gratefully acknowledge the long-standing support of Mr Colin Golvan QC.

Past ABR Internships

06 February 2015 Written by Australian Book Review

Comments from previous Editorial Cadets/Interns 

Dilan Gunawardana

'I am extremely grateful to have been offered an editorial internship, and to eventually work in a more senior capacity, at Australian Book Review. I feel a tremendous sense of pride to have worked for a prestigious literary and arts journal that upholds exemplary editorial standards while fostering emerging talent. I am excited by the potential of ABR to grow further and continue to be the gold standard of Australian arts and literary journalism.'

Dilan Gunawardana
ABR Deputy Editor (Digital) 2017-2018
ABR
Editorial Intern 2016–17


Luke Horton smaller'ABR’s editorial internship is something very rare and valuable: an opportunity for a recent graduate to take the skills they have been taught and develop them in the rigorous editorial environment of a high calibre literary and arts magazine. By requiring you to be active across all aspects of the production of the magazine, from commissioning reviews, to copyediting and proofreading, to introducing new features to the magazine, through to digitising the issue each month for ABR Online, it prepares you for the widest range of possible roles in the publishing industry.'

Luke Horton
ABR Editorial Intern 2015–16


Sam Zifchak 2‘What I valued most about the internship was the diversity and range of the position. I was able to explore and work in all aspects of the magazine’s production, from formatting, editing, advertising, designing, paging, and researching, to digitising the entire magazine online. I feel that the skills and knowledge that I acquired throughout the internship will place me in good stead to tackle any new position in the publication sphere with confidence, knowledge, and editorial acumen.’

Sam Zifchak
ABR Editorial Intern 2014


Sara Savage

My time spent at ABR enabled me to engage with virtually every aspect of the magazine’s production in a way that is scarcely possible in other internships. The variety of the position is invaluable to any aspiring editor, as is the close contact you have in the role with the work of some of Australia’s finest writers. I certainly have ABR to thank for my subsequent employment as a magazine editor overseas.’

Sara Savage
ABR Patrons’ Editorial Intern, 2013


Milly Main‘Being on the staff of a magazine of the calibre of Australian Book Review, with its long history in Australian letters and fine editorial standards, is a singular experience, and it has no doubt been the defining event of my professional life thus far. I look forward to drawing on what I have learned at ABR in other areas of my career and my own writing.’

Milly Main
ABR Ian Potter Foundation Editorial Intern, 2012


Tim Brewer‘I am very proud of the contribution I was able to make at ABR, in particular through the development of ABR Online, which has already demonstrated its worth. I am also proud of the wide range of skills I have been able to develop, touching all aspects of the magazine’s development, editorial, and production.’

Tim Brewer
ABR Sidney Myer Fund Editorial Intern, 2011


Mark Gomes‘As the recipient of an internship at Australian Book Review in 2009, I know the benefits of such a program firsthand. My internship was an unqualified success, and resulted not only in an increase in my editing knowledge and skills, but also in full-time employment.’

Mark Gomes
ABR Australian Publishers Association Editorial Intern, 2009

2019 ABR Patrons' Fellowship – worth $10,000

04 February 2015 Written by Hidden Author

Applications for the 2019 ABR Patrons’ Fellowship have now closed. An announcement will be made in early 2019.

 

My year as an ABR fellow has been the most rewarding of my writing life. This year I've not only been encouraged, but supported, to press my ear against our culture's chest and listen to its heartbeat. I'm indebted to the ABR team, and its warm and generous community of readers and donors, for giving me the chance to grow into my profession.'

                                                                Beejay Silcox, ABR Fortieth Birthday Fellow (2018)

Australian Book Review is pleased to advertise the 2019 ABR Patrons’ Fellowship. Funded by ABR Patrons, the Fellowship is worth $10,000. The Fellow will make a broad contribution to the magazine throughout the year, with a series of four substantial articles.

ABR welcomes proposals from Australian creative writers, freelance reviewers, journalists, commentators and scholars. The Fellow’s articles will appear in the print magazine and ABR Online. Contributors to the magazine and previous Fellows and Fellowship applicants are strongly encouraged to apply.

Applications for the 2019 ABR Patrons' Fellowship closed at 5pm on 10 December 2018.



2019 ABR Patrons' Fellowship Application Guidelines

What is the Australian Book Review Patrons’ Fellowship?

This Fellowship – funded by Australian Book Review’s generous Patrons – will be a highlight of our 2019 publishing year. The Fellow will make a broad contribution to the magazine throughout the year, with a series of four substantial articles. ABR welcomes proposals from Australian creative writers, freelance reviewers, journalists, commentators, and scholars.

Who can apply?

Any writer with a publication record (books, creative writing, essays, or journalism) is eligible. Applicants must be Australian citizens or have permanent resident status in Australia. ABR staff and Board members are ineligible. Contributors to the magazine and previous Fellows and Fellowship applicants are strongly encouraged to apply.

What is ABR offering?

The Fellow will receive a total of $10,000, payable thus – $2,500 on announcement of the Fellowship and three further payments of $2,500 on publication of the final three contributions to the magazine. The Fellow will work closely with the Editor of ABR throughout the year.

Expected outcomes

ABR is seeking a suite of brilliant literary journalism from a highly engaged and professional writer. During the course of the Fellowship, the Fellow will produce four substantial articles for publication in the magazine in 2019. These can be review essays, commentaries, or interviews – or a combination of all three genres. Each contribution will be 2,000 words or longer. The features (agreed on with the ABR Editor) will be staggered throughout the year. The articles will appear in the print and online editions of ABR. The Fellow will be available for media coverage and at least one literary/promotional event. NB the Fellow is not expected to complete the Fellowship onsite.

Familiarity with Australian Book Review

ABR looks for support and engagement from its senior/regular contributors. Applicants must demonstrate considerable familiarity with ABR – its style, its content, its direction. Those totally new to or unfamiliar with the magazine or should not apply.

Selection process

The Fellow will be chosen by a panel including ABR Editor Peter Rose. We will announce the decision in early 2019. No correspondence will be entered into once the decision has been announced. ABR reserves the right not to award a Fellowship in a particular round.

How to apply?

Applicants are strongly encouraged to refer to the Frequently Asked Questions section on our website. Applicants may are also encouraged to discuss their proposals with the Editor before submitting them: (03) 9699 8822 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The application should comprise a proposal of 2-3 pages plus a short CV. Applicants should summarise the following: their interest in the magazine and its direction; why they believe their contributions will advance ABR and win us new readers; and the likely nature/scope/genre of the four proposed contributions. (We are mindful that the Fellowship will evolve throughout the year.) Applicants should also attach two examples of their literary journalism.

Applications must be emailed to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 5pm on 10 December 2018.

There is no application fee.

ABR gratefully acknowledges the generous support of the ABR Patrons.

 


The ABR Fellowships are intended to reward fine Australian writers and to advance the magazine's commitment to critical debate and long-form journalism. All published Australian writers are eligible to apply.

Click here to find out more about the ABR Fellowship program.

Click here to find out more about current Fellowships..

Click here to find out more about published Fellowships.

Please read our list of Frequently Asked Questions before contacting us with a question about the ABR Fellowship program.

2015 Jolley Prize

18 December 2014 Written by Hidden Author

Australian Book Review is delighted to announce Rob Magnuson Smith has won the 2015 ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize for his story 'The Elector of Nossnearly'. Steven Carroll announced Rob as the overall winner at the 2015 Brisbane Writers Festival. Michelle Cahill placed second for her story 'Borges and I' and Harriet McKnight came third for her story 'Crest'. Subscribers can read all three shortlisted stories in the September 2015 Fiction issue

This year the Jolley Prize – one of Australia’s most lucrative and prestigious awards for short fiction – attracted about 1,200 entries. The Jolley Prize was judged by ABR Deputy Editor Amy Baillieu, poet and academic Sarah Holland-Batt, and author Paddy O’Reilly. The Jolley Prize is worth $8,000 with a first prize of $5,000 and supplementary prizes of $2,000 and $1,000.


About the 2015 Jolley Prize shortlisted authors

Rob Magnuson SmithRob Magnuson Smith’s début novel, The Gravedigger, appeared in 2010 after winning the Pirate’s Alley William Faulkner Award. He has written many articles of investigative journalism for Playboy, where  he is contributing editor. His second novel is Scorper (Granta Books, 2015). A graduate of University of East Anglia’s MA in Creative Writing and Bath Spa University’s PhD in Creative Writing, Rob is currently a lecturer at Exeter University and lives in Cornwall. Subscribers can read his winning story 'The Elector of Nossnearly' in the September 2015 Fiction issue.

Michelle Cahill Michelle Cahill lives in Sydney. Her fiction has appeared in Meanjin, Etchings, and Southerly. She won the Kingston Writing School Hilary Mantel International Short Story Prize. She is a Doctoral Candidate in Creative Arts at the University of Wollongong. Her first short story collection, Letter to Pessoa, is forthcoming from Giramondo. Subscribers can read her story 'Borges and I' in the September 2015 Fiction issue.

Harriet McKnightHarriet McKnight currently lives in Melbourne. In 2014, her work was shortlisted for the Overland Victoria University Short Story Prize, and published in The Lifted Brow: Digital Edition. In May 2015, she featured as the writer in residence for The Suburban Review. Harriet has worked since 2012 as the deputy editor of The Canary Press. Subscribers can read her story 'Crest' in the September 2015 Fiction issue.


Please read our list of Frequently Asked Questions before contacting us with a question about the Jolley Prize.

You may be interested in reading the shortlisted stories from previous years. More information about all our past winners is available here, along with links to their stories.

'To win the ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize is a delicious honour.'
Gregory Day, joint winner, 2011

'ABR has also contributed to elevating the status of the short story with its annual Jolley Prize.'
Blanche Clark,
Herald Sun

ABR gratefully acknowledges Mr Ian Dickson's generous support for the Jolley Prize.

Calibre Essay Prize - Frequently Asked Questions

01 October 2014 Written by Australian Book Review

 

 

I don’t live in Australia and I am not an Australian citizen. Can I still enter the Calibre Essay Prize?
Yes. Anyone can enter the Calibre Essay Prize. But all essays must be written in English.

 

I’m interested in the Calibre Essay Prize but don’t know much about it. How can I familiarise myself with the competition?
This is the sixteenth time that ABR has presented this prize. Click here for more information about past winners. Subscribers can access all past winning stories, available to read in our online archive or to purchase in hard-copy from our online store. To learn more about becoming a subscriber, click here.

 

How can I find out more about ABR?
ABR is a cultural magazine that appears in print and online eleven times a year. You can subscribe to the magazine by clicking here, or you can purchase single issues here. Digital subscriptions start from as little as $10 per month.

 

When did the 2022 Calibre Essay Prize close?
Entries closed at 11:59pm (AEST) on 17 January 2022.

 

Is there a set theme or topic for the Calibre Essay Prize?
No, we welcome non-fiction essays of all kinds: personal or political, literary or speculative, traditional or experimental.

 

What is the word limit for the Calibre Essay Prize?
Essays must be between 2,000 and 5,000 words.

 

Should endnotes be included in the word count?
Yes. The maximum number of words is 5,000. While not rejecting endnotes, we discourage the inclusion of many.

 

Is ABR an academic journal? Are you looking for academic articles?
ABR is not an academic journal, though our interests are sophisticated and we publish many academics. We are looking for general non-fiction essays that will make brilliant literary journalism.

 

Are images acceptable?
Yes. You may illustrate your essay, but the total file size should not exceed 3 MB.

 

Can I enter multiple essays as one entry?
No. Separate entries must be made, and fees paid, for each essay entered into the Calibre Essay Prize. This is to ensure that a record is kept of each essay entered, and also to ensure that payment is successfully made for each. If you purchase a subscription to ABR, subsequent entries can be made at the subscriber rate of $15.

Is there a limit to the number of essays I can enter?
No, but as stated above, each essay must be entered and paid for separately as individual entries. If you purchase a subscription to ABR, subsequent entries can be made at the subscriber rate of $15.

 

Can I submit or publish the work I have entered in the Prize elsewhere while I await notification?
Yes, entries may be offered elsewhere during the judging of the Calibre Prize. If an entrant is longlisted and has their essay offered elsewhere, the entrant will have 24 hours to decide if they would like to withdraw their essay on offer elsewhere or from the Calibre Prize.

 

I have written an essay with a colleague. Are we eligible to enter the Calibre Essay Prize?
No, entries must be single-authored.

 

Are translated essays eligible for entry in the Calibre Essay Prize?
No.

 

To be eligible for entry in the Calibre Essay Prize, essays must not have been previously published. What constitutes ‘publication’?
Publication includes, but is not limited to, publication in print and online (for example in a journal/magazine/anthology or on a website). Publication on a personal blog/website/social media constitutes publication. If an essay has been written and assessed as part of a writing course but has not been distributed further, that does not constitute publication. Please contact us if you are unsure about eligibility at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or on (03) 9699 8822.

 

My essay was shortlisted/longlisted/commended for another prize. May I enter it in the Calibre Essay Prize?
If your essay was shortlisted/commended for another prize but was not published, then it can be entered in the Calibre Essay Prize. Please contact us if you are unsure about eligibility at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or on (03) 9699 8822.

 

My essay was shortlisted/longlisted/commended for a previous Calibre Essay Prize. May I enter it in this year’s Calibre Essay Prize?

Essays that were publicly shortlisted, longlisted or commended in a previous Calibre Essay Prize are ineligible.

 

Can I enter my essay using a pseudonym?
No, pseudonyms are not permitted.

 

Can I enter by post?
No, entries must be submitted online.

 

How should I format my essay?
Entries should be presented with 1.5 line spacing and in 12 pt font size. The pages should be numbered. Your name must not appear in the manuscript or in the title of the digital file as judging is conducted blind. 

 

Who is eligible to pay the discounted entry fee?
Current print and/or digital subscribers are able to pay the discounted entry fee of AU$15 per entry. Non-subscribers pay AU$25 per entry. If you would like to subscribe to ABR, click here.

Alternatively, you can purchase a print and/or digital subscription with your entry. We have a variety of options, each listed below. Upon successful payment, your subscription will be automatically ready to use. You will receive an email with your details. After signing in to the website with the Username and Password you have chosen, you will be able to enter any additional essays at the discounted rate.

Current ABR subscribers: $15
Standard/non-subscribers: $25*
Entry + 1-year digital subscription: $80
Entry + 1-year print subscription (Australia): $100
Entry + 1-year print subscription (NZ and Asia): $190
Entry + 1-year print subscription (Rest of World): $210

Note: Print subscribers must provide their subscriber number to be eligible for the discounted rate (this can be found on the flysheet sent out with the magazine, or on renewal notices – alternatively, email us and we will provide you with your subscriber number).

 

Can I pay with PayPal?
No. At this time we are accepting credit card payments only – Visa and MasterCard.

 

Will I receive confirmation of payment?
Yes, once you have submitted your online entry and payment form, you will receive a confirmation email at the email address you supplied in the form. Keep a copy for your records. If you cannot find the confirmation email, be sure to check that it has not gone to your spam or junk folders.

 

Who are the judges this year?
The 2022 judges are Declan Fry, Beejay Silcox, and Peter Rose. Click here for more information about the 2022 judges.

 

Will you give me feedback about my essay?
Unfortunately we don’t have the time or resources to comment on individual essays.

 

How can I stay in touch with news about the Calibre Essay Prize?
If you have provided us with a current email address we will contact you with news about the Calibre Essay Prize. Another way to stay up-to-date with news about the Prize and other ABR prizes and events is to sign up to our newsletters. You can also follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

 

Where can I find the complete Terms and Conditions of entry?
These can be found here.

 

My question isn’t answered here, what should I do?
If you have a question about the Calibre Essay Prize that isn't answered here, or in the Terms & Conditions, please contact us via the comments facility below and we will respond when we can (your queries will not be posted publicly). Alternatively, please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or on (03) 9699 8822.

2014 Jolley Prize Winner: Jennifer Down

01 September 2014 Written by Amy Baillieu

Announcing the 2014 Jolley Prize winner

Jennifer Down was named the winner of the 2014 Jolley Prize by Ian Dickson at The Cube, ACMI on Saturday 30 August. She received a total of $5,000 for her winning short story, ‘Aokigahara’. Faith Oxenbridge came second place with her story 'The Art of Life', winning $2,000, and Cate Kennedy came third with 'Doisneau's Kiss', winning $1,000. We would like to congratulate all shortlisted entrants and thank all those who entered their stories.


20140830 041Jennifer Down at the announcement ceremony (photograph by Torunn Momtazi)

The ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize is one of the country’s most prestigious awards for short fiction. This year it attracted about 1200 entries, most of them newly written for this competition. They kept busy our three judges: Cassandra Atherton, Amy Baillieu, and Patrick Allington.

Porter Prize Frequently Asked Questions

26 August 2014 Written by Australian Book Review

Do I have to be a paid ABR subscriber to enter?

No, you do not have to be a paid ABR subscriber to enter our prizes. However, you will need to sign in to an existing account or create a new one in order to enter. 

 

Why do I need to sign in?

Non-subscribers who enter an ABR prize receive a free four-month digital subscription. If you are a non-subscriber, simply create a new account as part of your entry.

Current subscribers who sign in will gain access to the discounted entry rate. If you are not a current subscriber but your email is associated with an old account, signing in enables us to automatically process your complimentary digital access or bundled subscription. 

If you have previously entered an ABR prize, you will have received a free four-month digital subscription. This means your details exist in our system and you will need to sign in to enter. See below if you have forgotten your sign-in details.

 

I have forgotten my Username/Password

If you do not know your sign-in details, visit Forgot Username or Forgot Password to update them. If you have any problems, please contact us by emailing This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by calling the ABR office on (03) 9699 8822 during work hours.

 

I don’t live in Australia and I am not an Australian citizen. Can I still enter?

Yes, you can. Anyone can enter the Porter Prize. But all poems must be written in English.

 

I’m interested in the Porter Prize but don’t know much about it. How can I familiarise myself with the competition?

This is the eighteenth time Australian Book Review has presented a poetry prize. Past issues containing the shortlisted and winning poems are available for subscribers to read online in our online archive, or to purchase in hard-copy from our online store.

Click here for more information about past winners.

 

How can I find out more about Australian Book Review?

ABR is a literary and cultural magazine that appears in print and online ten times a year. There is a full Publishing Profile on our website. You can purchase print and/or digital subscriptions here, with digital subscriptions starting from just $10 per month. You can also order individual copies of the print edition.

 

Who was Peter Porter?

Peter Porter – born in Queensland and based in London for almost all his adult life – was one of Australia’s greatest poets. His vast body of poetry was gathered in two Collected Poems, and his poems appear in any serious anthology of Australian or British verse. They are well represented in Copyright Agency’s Australian Poetry Library. His most famous poetry collection is The Cost of Seriousness (1978). Porter edited several anthologies, including The Oxford Book of Modern Australian Verse (1996). He wrote thousands of reviews, essays, lectures, and introductions. His work appeared in Australian Book Review from 1985 to 2010. His fellow poet–critic Peter Steele, who wrote a monograph on Porter, published this tribute in ABR following Peter Porter’s death on 23 April 2010. ABR’s poetry prize was renamed in his honour following his death.

 

When does the 2022 Porter Prize close?

Entries closed at midnight, 4 October 2021.

 

Is there a set theme or topic for the Porter Prize?

No, poems can be on any subject and in any style.

 

How do I know if my poem is an eligible length to enter the Porter Prize?

Entries can be up to 70 lines long. The following are not included in the 70-line limit: the title of the poem, epigraph, stanza breaks, and internal numbers.

 

To be eligible for entry in the Porter Prize, poems must not have been previously published. What constitutes ‘publication’?

Publication includes, but is not limited to, publication in print and online (for example in a journal/magazine/anthology or on a website). Publication on a personal blog/website/social media constitutes publication. If a poem has been written and assessed as part of a writing course but has not been distributed further, this does not constitute publication.

 

My poem was shortlisted/commended for another prize, may I enter it in the Porter Prize?

If your poem was shortlisted/commended for another prize but was not published, then it may be entered in the Porter Prize. Please contact us if you are unsure about eligibility.

 

Can I submit or publish the work I have entered in the Prize elsewhere while I await notification?

Entries may be offered elsewhere during the judging of the Porter Prize. If an entrant is longlisted and has their poem offered elsewhere, the entrant will have 24 hours to decide if they would like to withdraw their poem on offer elsewhere or from the Porter Prize. Exclusivity is essential for longlisted poems.

 

Can I enter multiple poems in one entry?

No. Separate entries must be made, and entry fees paid, for each poem entered into the Porter Prize. This is to ensure that a record is kept of each poem entered, and also to ensure that payment is successfully made for each.

 

Is there a limit to the number of poems I can enter?

No, but as stated above, each poem must be entered and paid for separately, as individual entries.

 

I have written a poem with a friend, are we eligible to enter the Porter Prize?

No, poems entered into the Porter Prize must be written by one individual author.

 

Are translated poems eligible for entry in the Porter Prize?

No.

 

What are the prizes on offer in the 2022 Porter Prize?

The Porter Prize is now worth a total of $10,000. A shortlist of five poems will be published in the January–February 2022 issue. The winner and runners-up will be announced later that month. The winner receives $6,000. The other four shortlisted poets will each receive $1,000.

 

Can I pay the discounted entry fee?

Current print and digital subscribers may pay the discounted entry fee of AU$15 per entry. Non-subscribers pay AU$25 per entry. If you would like to subscribe to Australian Book Review in print or digital, click here

Alternatively you can purchase a yearly digital subscription to ABR with your entry for the combined price of AU$80. You will be entitled to enter any additional poems at the discounted rate. We also offered combined print subscriptions and Porter entry packages. A full list of these rates appears below:

Porter Entry (Subscriber): $15
Porter Entry (Non-Subscriber)*: $25
Porter Entry + ABR one-year digital subscription: $80
Porter Entry + ABR one-year print subscription (within Australia): $100
Porter Entry + ABR one-year print subscription (within New Zealand/Asia): $190
Porter Entry + ABR one-year print subscription (ROW): $210

* Entrants who choose not to subscribe when entering the Porter Prize, and who are not already current ABR subscribers, will be provided with digital access to ABR, free of charge, for four months. Eligible entrants will be contacted when their complimentary subscription has been activated.

Note: Print subscribers must provide their subscriber number to be eligible for the discounted rate (this can be found on the flysheet sent out with the magazine, or on renewal notices – alternatively, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and we will provide you with your subscriber number). Likewise, yearly digital subscribers to ABR must provide the email address with which they registered the online subscription.

 

Can I pay with PayPal?

At this time we are accepting credit card payments ONLY – Visa and MasterCard. We regret that we cannot accept AMEX at this time.

 

Will I receive confirmation of payment?

Yes, once you have submitted your online entry and payment form, you will receive a confirmation email at the email address you supplied in the form. Keep a copy for your records. If you cannot find the confirmation email, be sure to check that it has not gone to your spam or junk folders.

 

Can I enter by post?

No, entries must be submitted online.

 

Who are the judges this year?

The 2022 judges are Sarah Holland-Batt, Jaya Savige and Anders Villani.

 

Will you give me feedback about my poem?

We don’t have the time or resources to comment on individual poems.

 

How should I format my poem?

Entries should be presented with 1.5 line spacing and in 12 pt font size. The pages of poems should be numbered. The author’s name must not appear on the manuscript or in the name of the digital file.

 

How can I stay in touch with news about the Porter Prize?

If you have provided us with a current email address we will contact you with news about the Prize. Another way to stay up to date with news about the Prize and other ABR prizes and events is to sign up to our free monthly e-News. You can also follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook.

 

Where can I find the complete terms and conditions of entry?

These can be found here.

 

My question isn't answered here, what should I do?

If you have a question about the Porter Prize that isn't answered here, or in the entry guidelines, please contact us via the comments facility below and we will respond when we can.

2013 Porter Prize Winner: John A. Scott

30 July 2014 Written by Amy Baillieu

Four Sonnets

The Drowning of Charles Kruger, Fireman
(St Valentine’s Day, 1908)

Comes a fire into Canal Street:
its rows of clapboard tenements rotting back
to marsh. He knows it too well, the ‘furniture
district’. This time, a fire built on picture frames.
Charles Kruger drops onto what he thought
a cellar floor, finding instead his New World to be
eight feet of seepage bound by stone. He kicks
back to smoky air. From above come voices.
Lanterns play upon the shifting surface, sending
wobblings of light across the walls (ectoplasm
of his own trembling device) – the ghost of him
seeking release. He gives it up. Warbles out
his love. He takes the eager water: a brief
consummation made of thrashing arms.

Gustav Mahler in New York (1908)

It is the bass drum which has summoned him.
The dull collisions of felted wool against calf­
skin. The end of everything, he knows, these
muted thuds.
The Mahlers have taken an
eleventh-floor suite (there are two grand pianos),
at the Hotel Majesticon Central Park West.
He joins Alma at the window. Directly below,
is the halted cortège of Charles Kruger.
Once more, the tufted mallet meets the drum­
head. He sees the tight-packed waves speed
upwards, rattle through the window and collide
with his chest. He recoils. Curves his body at
the waist. A bow (conductor to his audience),
only contorted thus, gasping for air.

Mahler at Toblach (1910)

Madness, seize me and destroy me,
he scrawls across the staves. To the movement
(purgatorio)he adds a final, isolated note. Marks
it thus – ‘completely muffled drum’. At which
the four-paned windows of the häuschen burst
apart and the room fills with grey feathers.
He rises, choking. A storm of plumaged air
beating at his face. Then gone. He gathers up
the sketches from the floor. The young architect
has declared his love – (misaddressing it, he
claims, to Herr Direktor Mahler). My Almschili
he scrawls, You are not ashamed, it is I who am.
Alas, I still love you.Who finds his mouth
crammed full with soaked grey feathers.

Epilogue (1911)

Back in New York the throat infection re-
occurs. He conducts Busoni’s Berceuse
Élégiaque and returns to Europe.
Bacteria now gather at the lesioned heart.
‘My Almachi’, he cries again (again). At some
point the kidneys fail. Black water seeps into
his lungs. He drowns by tiny increments –
the death mask imparts a serenity
not on display during his final hours.

He has entrusted his sketches of the
Tenth to Alma. In the salon she tears
the most damning scrawl from the manuscript.
Carries it to the fire. Sets it to flame.