Double Time: Women in Victoria – 150 Years edited by Marilyn Lake and Farley Kelly

by
May 1985, no. 70

Double Time: Women in Victoria – 150 Years edited by Marilyn Lake and Farley Kelly

Double Time: Women in Victoria – 150 Years edited by Marilyn Lake and Farley Kelly

by
May 1985, no. 70

The first idea I remember having about the past as history was that people were more brutish then and more unjust because they were more ignorant. History was progress. This was the enlightened age.

I was about nine at the time, a boarder at a Catholic convent in Gippsland, but my naive notions of history were still shared by many historians. I had already devoured the ten volumes of Arthur Mees’s Children’s Encyclopaedia, especially the Greek and Roman myths and English kings and queens and proceeded to an ancient and British history in twenty volumes. My experience of Australian history was confined to Ethel Turner, Mary Grant Bruce, and a picture book series of stories from eighteenth- and nineteenth-century history – the explorers Eureka, the Rum Rebellion. Hegel came a lot later, and, strangely enough, via one of the nuns.

Kate Ahearne reviews 'Double Time: Women in Victoria – 150 Years' edited by Marilyn Lake and Farley Kelly

Double Time: Women in Victoria – 150 Years

edited by Marilyn Lake and Farley Kelly

From the New Issue

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