The Glasshouse by Natalie Scott

Reviewed by
December 1985–January 1986, no. 77
Susan Lever reviews 'The Glasshouse' by Natalie Scott

The Glasshouse

by Natalie Scott

Rigby, 134 pp, $14.95 hb, $9.96 pb

The Glasshouse by Natalie Scott

Reviewed by
December 1985–January 1986, no. 77

At a time when novels by women must run the gauntlet of feminist criticism it is surprising to find one which is prepared to discuss love and female dependence without any deference to feminism. Natalie Scott makes it clear that her heroine lives in ‘liberated’ times but she insists that the need for love remains a fundamental human weakness or strength. Furthermore, she is not afraid to link a woman’s desire for beauty with her need for love. The traditional feminine concern for beautiful things and personal beauty becomes in The Glasshouse part of a search for completeness, though the other interpretation – that it is evidence of feminine materialism and obsession with security – is also acknowledged. At the same time, Natalie Scott’s writing is careful, considered, occasionally witty, and always finely crafted. Her narrator, Alexandra Pawley, convincingly conveys the attitudes of an intelligent and well-groomed woman who desperately wants to form her life into a beautiful pattern.

Susan Lever reviews 'The Glasshouse' by Natalie Scott

The Glasshouse

by Natalie Scott

Rigby, 134 pp, $14.95 hb, $9.96 pb

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