Non Fiction

Four decades after his seminal book ‘Homosexual: Oppression and Liberation’, Dennis Altman has published a new study of the homosexual in Australian society. Robert Reynolds is our reviewer. ... (read more)
Jacqueline Kent – Julia Gillard’s first biographer – reviews journalist Kerry-Anne Walsh’s highly partisan account of Gillard’s ill-fated prime ministership and the ceaseless hospitality of the Rudd camp. ... (read more)

In the Moscow archives

Sheila Fitzpatrick
Thursday, 22 August 2013
Distinguished Soviet historian Sheila Fitzpatrick – now back in Australia – writes about her remarkable experiences in Moscow from 1966 and about the perils of being an exchange student and researcher. ... (read more)

Stephanie Owen Reeder reviews new picture books addressing war

Stephanie Owen Reeder
Thursday, 27 June 2013

Depicting war in a picture book requires a deft hand. Historical imperatives need to be considered, while also avoiding glorifying war for a young and impressionable audience. Ideally, such books should promote informed discussion rather than mindless militarism.

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Gig Ryan reviews 'Home by Dark' by Pam Brown

Gig Ryan
Thursday, 27 June 2013

Home by Dark is Pam Brown’s seventeenth book. She has also published ten chapbooks, including two collaborations. Brown’s poems are mostly elliptical, pithy, hewn into slight lines that imply or jest. Each poem manoeuvres and collects the everyday. It is an aesthetic of accumulation, a bricolage that ...

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Anthony Lynch on Corey Wakeling's 'Goad Omen'

Anthony Lynch
Thursday, 27 June 2013

Early in his Literary Theory: An Introduction, Terry Eagleton quotes the Russian formalist critic Roman Jakobson: ‘[literature is writing that represents] organised violence committed on ordinary speech.’ I don’t know if Corey Wakeling has been influenced by the formalists’ theories, but Goad Omen, his energetic first collection, is reple ...

Cassandra Atherton on 'Island: issue 132'

Cassandra Atherton
Thursday, 27 June 2013

The Kantian epigraph to this issue of Island points to an exploration of the island as ‘the land of truth’, with the ocean around it as ‘the native home of illusion’. In this way, the translation of experience, both real and imagined, is navigated in clever and topical ways. The emphasis on ‘island’ as a micro-metonym for Tasmania demonstrat ...

'The Cambridge Companion to American Poetry Since 1945'

Alexander Howard
Thursday, 27 June 2013

The scene: a cold, bright January day in the snow-covered capital of the United States. The occasion: the presidential inauguration of John F. Kennedy. Up to the podium steps America’s unofficial poet laureate, eighty-six-year-old Robert Frost. Temporarily blinded by the glare of brilliant sunshine and freshly fallen snow, Frost sets aside the handwritten te ...

Alistaire Bowler reviews 'A Lasting Record'

Alistaire Bowler
Thursday, 27 June 2013

In A Lasting Record, journalist and food writer Stephen Downes recounts the serendipitous tale of an eccentric music lover from Melbourne who, with a primitive home recording device, captured the only extant recording of American pianist William Kapell’s final performance. Downes vacillates between biography, literature, diary, and musicological criti ...

Gillian Dooley reviews 'Boy, Lost'

Gillian Dooley
Thursday, 27 June 2013

Boy, Lost is a sad and shocking memoir, unique in particulars but not in broad outline. Domestic violence and psychological sadism lie at its heart.

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