Non Fiction

Rachel Robertson reviews 'Dying: A memoir' by Cory Taylor

Rachel Robertson
23 May 2016

We must all die, but many of us live as though we don't know this fact. When death comes close to us or our loved ones, we may feel totally unprepared ...

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Andrea Goldsmith reviews 'In Praise of Forgetting: Historical memory and its ironies' by David Rieff

Andrea Goldsmith
23 May 2016

Over the past three decades, and particularly since the prime ministership of John Howard, there has been an extraordinary growth in the number of ...

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Lucas Grainger-Brown reviews 'Credlin & Co.' by Aaron Patrick and 'The Road to Ruin' by Niki Savva

Lucas Grainger-Brown
23 May 2016

In August 2014, then Prime Minister Tony Abbott gave a short speech disagreeing with the contention put forward in Triumph and Demise: The Broken Promise ...

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Kathryn Koromilas reviews 'The Demons of Athens' by Vrasidas Karalis

Kathryn Koromilas
27 March 2015

Sing, O muse, of the rage of the daemons, soulless sons of Hellenes, that have brought countless ills upon the Greeks. Sing, O Vrasidas Karalis of your descent into the Greek inferno and of the quarrels that have plagued our citizens. Sing, O brave soul, sing your reports from the Great Devastation.

Forgive my classicist sentimentality. How else to begin a r ... More

Robert O'Neill reviews 'War! What Is It Good For?' by Ian Morris

Robert O'Neill
16 December 2014

It is a brave author who produces a book proclaiming the usefulness of war at a time when most of us are thinking about the horrors and wastefulness of World War I. Ian Morris, British by birth but now the Willard Professor of Classics at Stanford, and author of Why The West Rules – For Now (2010), has done just that and is receiving praise for his efforts. ... More

Danielle Clode: 'Seeing the wood for the trees'

Danielle Clode
27 October 2014

Many years ago, after working for a while in Europe, we returned to Australia via America. We picked up a car in Atlanta and drove through sprawling cities, alarming slums, and abandoned downtowns. Across Mississippi and the broad, reassuring openness of Texas, to Arizona and the Grand Canyon, we passed through the alien electrics of Las Vegas, down into Death Valle ... More

Peter Rose reviews 'Joe Cinque's Consolation' by Helen Garner

Peter Rose
02 October 2014

Already, Anu Singh’s story is grimly familiar. Now free again, just thirty-one, she has entered the popular pantheon of malefactors. Her attractive face appears in the newspapers, taut with self-justification. There is talk of a documentary. Notoriety, even a kind of celebrity – that amoral nirvana – is hers.

If Singh’s deepest motivation f ... More

2014 Calibre Prize (Winner): Unearthing the Past

Christine Piper
25 March 2014

Christine Piper is the winner of the 2014 Calibre Prize for an Outstanding Essay, worth $5,000. In this powerful essay, she writes about Japanese biological weapons and wartime experiments on living human beings.

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Debbie Hamilton's 'Out of Bounds'

Debi Hamilton
27 November 2013

Last week I received an envelope in the mail, the address written in my father’s hand. My heart accelerated a little and it struck me as unseemly, at my age and in my circumstances, to be still so easily rattled by a parent.

The envelope was light – inside I found only a newspaper clipping and a small note. I spread them out on the kitchen bench. A frien ... More

James Walter on the new biography of Margaret Thatcher

James Walter
30 October 2013

Our media treat leaders as personifying everything that matters, yet social scientists disdain leadership. Most of what we know about leaders comes from biographies. And biography, dominated by those wishing either to demonise, or to celebrate, their subject, is a craft monopolised by insiders, acolytes, and journalists. Regarding Margaret Thatcher, academics ... More

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