Commentary

The City of Palaces by Gabriel García Ochoa

Gabriel García Ochoa

Describing Mexico City without tripping over a cliché is not easy. Vibrant, colourful, dangerous, loud, exhilarating, rich in history and gastronomic delights, it’s all been ...

More

Episode #12 The City of Palaces by Gabriel García Ochoa

Gabriel García Ochoa reports back from Mexico following the US election in his article 'The City of Palaces' which appears in the January-February issue of Australian Book Review. ... More

Hydra as intimate theatre by Paul Genoni

Paul Genoni

In late 1963, Rodney Hall – an aspiring but unpublished poet and novelist – travelled through Greece’s Saronic islands with his wife and their infant daughter. Shortly after ...

More

'The god of cheaper prices: New threats to our literary culture from the Productivity Commission' by Colin Golvan

Colin Golvan

The federal government has been promoting the innovation economy, but is considering recommendations for legal reform which will undermine the financial and cultural interests ...

More

'Bobbin Up by Dorothy Hewett' by Nicholas Jose

Nicholas Jose

'Bobbin Up was written in 1958 during eight weeks of the coldest Sydney winter on record', recalled Dorothy Hewett in her introduction to the Virago Modern Classics reprint of her ...

More

'The debate over 18C' by David Rolph

David Rolph

It is not often that a legislative provision leaves the pages of the statute books and enters everyday conversation. Statutory interpretation rarely enters public consciousness ...

More

'On John Foster' by John Rickard

John Rickard

When Take Me to Paris, Johnny was first published in 1993, the AIDS crisis seemed to be at its worst. Many of us had friends and acquaintances who were dying. One began to notice men who, thin and haggard, one feared were suffering from AIDS (women victims being relatively few in number). There was no sign of the drug therapies that would, towards the end o ... More

'Letter from New Orleans' by Kevin Rabalais

Kevin Rabalais

The streets of New Orleans double as scented gardens for the blind. Round any corner in the Vieux Carré – known to most as the French Quarter – and experience the assault of sensory details. It might start with a spicy tang of boiling seafood, crawfish, or shrimp or crabs plucked from the amphibious Louisiana land. Maybe it's frying beignets or praline mixture ... More

'Randolph Stow's Harwich' by Suzanne Falkiner

Suzanne Falkiner

The port of Old Harwich can be approached by a streamlined highway through a barren industrial landscape, or via the high street through suburban Dovercourt. Either way, you keep going until you reach the sea: 'and if you get your feet wet, you've gone too far', they'll say when you ask directions. Finally, you reach an enclave of narrow streets lined by small cotta ... More

'Kindness by Numbers' by Robyn Archer

Robyn Archer

Robyn Archer debated Peter Singer during the 2015 Melbourne Writers Festival; their topic was 'Is Funding the Arts Doing Good?'. This is an edited version of her paper.

I hear that in New York
At the corner of 26th Street and Broadway
A man stands every evening during the winter months
And gets bed ... More
Page 1 of 2
Australian Book Review Logo

Studio 2
207 City Road
Southbank VIC 3006

Tel: (03) 9699 8822
Fax: (03) 9699 8803

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Close Panel

ABR Online Login