Accessibility Tools

  • Content scaling 100%
  • Font size 100%
  • Line height 100%
  • Letter spacing 100%

Negotiating tensions

Examining how Australia has gone to war
by
October 2022, no. 447

The War Game: Australian war leadership from Gallipoli to Iraq' by by David Horner

Allen & Unwin, $45 pb, 478 pp

Negotiating tensions

Examining how Australia has gone to war
by
October 2022, no. 447
General Thomas Blamey with Prime Minister John Curtin and Elsie Curtin, 1944  (National Library of Australia via Wikimedia Commons)
General Thomas Blamey with Prime Minister John Curtin and Elsie Curtin, 1944 (National Library of Australia via Wikimedia Commons)

At first sight, the title of David Horner’s new book, The War Game, is an uncharacteristically flippant reference by a serious historian to a deadly serious business. Horner has taken the term from writers such as Jonathan Swift and Horace Walpole, who saw war being treated as a game in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The carnage of the industrial-scale wars of the twentieth century, with their current reverberations in Ukraine, makes the phrase seem almost offensive, as does the frightening prospect of a full-scale war between the United States and China over Taiwan.

Peter Edwards reviews 'The War Game: Australian war leadership from Gallipoli to Iraq' by David Horner

The War Game: Australian war leadership from Gallipoli to Iraq' by

by David Horner

Allen & Unwin, $45 pb, 478 pp

From the New Issue

You May Also Like

Leave a comment

If you are an ABR subscriber, you will need to sign in to post a comment.

If you have forgotten your sign in details, or if you receive an error message when trying to submit your comment, please email your comment (and the name of the article to which it relates) to ABR Comments. We will review your comment and, subject to approval, we will post it under your name.

Please note that all comments must be approved by ABR and comply with our Terms & Conditions.