Acts of intimate banality

Questioning the axing of Casey Jenkins’s grant
by
December 2020, no. 427

Acts of intimate banality

Questioning the axing of Casey Jenkins’s grant
by
December 2020, no. 427

Like much feminist performance art since the 1960s, Casey Jenkins’s latest performance piece, titled IMMACULATE, centres on a female body – Jenkins’s own. IMMACULATE is a performance that documents the legal and commonly practised process of self-insemination in the home.

After initially awarding funding to the work, the Australia Council has rescinded the grant, stating: ‘We cannot be party to any act that could result in bringing a new life into the world.’ While the Council denies ideological reasons or political pressure behind its U-turn decision – despite having sent the artist a transcript of Peta Credlin’s scathing condemnation of the work on her Sky News talk show prior to announcing the funding cut – the response more troublingly points to a long history of political and institutional attempts to control how women use their bodies and assert their reproductive rights.

From the New Issue

Comments (7)

  • Posted by Cassandra
    12 February 2021
  • Posted by Sue Bond
    02 January 2021
  • Posted by Hayley
    09 December 2020
  • Posted by Lara Stevens
    09 December 2020
  • Posted by Helen Balzer
    04 December 2020
  • Posted by Katherine vowles
    03 December 2020
  • Posted by Hayley
    03 December 2020

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