Shannon Burns

Shannon Burns reviews 'Dying in the First Person' by Nike Sulway

Shannon Burns
23 August 2016

During boyhood, Samuel and his twin brother, Morgan, invent and in a sense inhabit a world and language called 'Nahum'. Years later – after a family tragedy ...

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Books of the Year 2015

Robert Adamson et al.
23 November 2015

Jennifer Maiden's The Fox Petition: New Poems (Giramondo) conjures foxes 'whose eyes were ghosts with pity' and foxes of language that transform the world's headlines

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Letters to the Editor - October 2015

28 September 2015

CHILDHOOD SEX!

Dear Editor,

Shannon Burns’s splendid ABR Patrons’ Fellowship essay, ‘The Scientist of His Own Experience: A Profile of Gerard Murnane, is rich in insights and pithy observations, plus some rather fine photographs (August ... More

Shannon Burns reviews 'Something for the Pain' by Gerald Murnane

Shannon Burns
25 September 2015

Narrators in Gerald Murnane’s novels and stories have occasionally scorned autobiography. Near the beginning of A Million Windows (2014), for example, we find: ‘Today, I understand that so-called autobiography is only one of the least worthy varieties of ficti ... More

'The scientist of his own experience: A Profile of Gerald Murnane' by Shannon Burns

Shannon Burns
28 July 2015

The town of Goroke (population six hundred) stands almost exactly between Melbourne and Adelaide, in the Wimmera region of Victoria. It is, in many ways, a typical small country town. If you drive there in the morning during late spring or early summer, you’ll need to slow the car to avoid kangaroos on the road. Magpies are everywhere. Horses and other livestock m ... More

Coetzee Colloquium

Shannon Burns
19 November 2014

Few authors summon the various modes of irony to better purpose than J.M. Coetzee. Typically, before Coetzee gives a reading, the audience can safely suppose that they are in for a good laugh, the odd squirm and cringe, and at least one moment of bewilderment. But there are exceptions to this general rule, and the several hundred people who gathered to hear Coetzee ... More

Shannon Burns reviews 'Three Stories' by J.M. Coetzee

Shannon Burns
30 October 2014

Each fiction in this small but handsome volume emerges from an interesting, perhaps even ‘transitional’ phase in J.M. Coetzee’s writing life: between the publication of Disgrace (1999) and Slow Man (2005); before and after receiving the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2003. The first story in the collection also predates Coetzee’s move to Adelaid ... More

Gerald Murnane's new novel

Shannon Burns
22 July 2014
Gerald Murnane – one of our most original voices – has published a new novel about the narrator and ‘dark-haired females’. Shannon Burns describes it in his review as ‘a triumph of creative configuration’. More

Shannon Burns reviews a new biography of Kafka

Shannon Burns
28 March 2014

Franz Kafka lived in Prague in the early part of the twentieth century, during a period of considerable turmoil. Before succumbing to laryngeal tuberculosis aged forty, he witnessed the disintegration of an empire and the subsequent formation of a republic. Kafka also endured the administrative and domestic realities of a world war and was among millions of European ... More

Shannon Burns reviews a new biography of Derrida

Shannon Burns
31 October 2013

By what right, and in accordance with what set of social conditions or teleological commitments, ideologies, cultural and biographical conventions, and in whose name might one begin to speak of, formulate, detail, or analyse the life of Jackie aka ‘Jacques’ Derrida?

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