Gerard Windsor reviews 'Absolute Power: How the pope became the most influential man in the world' by Paul Collins

Gerard Windsor reviews 'Absolute Power: How the pope became the most influential man in the world' by Paul Collins

Absolute Power: How the pope became the most influential man in the world

by Paul Collins

PublicAffairs, $39.99 hb, 368 pp, 9781610398602

For more than thirty years, Paul Collins has been His Holiness’s loyal opposition. Absolute Power is the latest round in his spirited debate with the Vatican, the government which has the largest constituency of any in the world.

Collins’s interest, in fact obsession, is in the nature and limits of that licence to govern – except that he would question whether the notion of government should come into it at all. The crucial text for his case is Christ’s rebuke to the squabbling apostles: ‘Anyone who wants to become great among you, must be your servant ... For the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve.’ But this is a tricky text. Christ, as the incarnate God, remains boss. So the pope may be referred to as ‘the servant of the servants of God’. But any monarch, whether tyrannical or benevolent, serves a people by calling the shots for them.

Read the rest of this article by subscribing to ABR Online for as little as $10 a month.

We offer a range of subscription options, including print, which can be found by clicking here. If you are already a subscriber, enter your username and password in the ‘Log In’ section in the top right-hand corner of the screen.

If you require assistance, contact us or consult the Frequently Asked Questions page.

Gerard Windsor

Gerard Windsor

Gerard Windsor’s most recent book is The Tempest-Tossed Church: Being a Catholic today. He has published twelve books: fiction, memoirs, comic verse, essays, a non-fiction account of an Australian infantry company in Vietnam, and an extended essay on the Camino to Santiago de Compostela. He has long reviewed for the Fairfax and New Limited newspapers.  

Leave a comment

Please note that all comments must be approved by ABR and comply with our Terms & Conditions.

NB: If you are an ABR Online subscriber or contributor, you will need to login to ABR Online in order to post a comment. If you have forgotten your login details, or if you receive an error message when trying to submit your comment, please email your comment (and the name of the article to which it relates) to comments@australianbookreview.com.au. We will review your comment and, subject to approval, we will post it under your name.