Kate Griffiths reviews 'Sunlight and Seaweed: An argument for how to feed, power, and clean up the world' by Tim Flannery

Kate Griffiths reviews 'Sunlight and Seaweed: An argument for how to feed, power, and clean up the world' by Tim Flannery

Sunlight and Seaweed: An argument for how to feed, power, and clean up the world

by Tim Flannery

Text Publishing, $19.99 pb, 181 pp, 9781925498684

The world is embarking on a journey to a clean energy future. Some places are well on their way; most have barely begun. We will all need to get there eventually. How long it takes comes down to political choices, economic realities, and technological breakthroughs. The consequences of delay are already well known. In Sunlight and Seaweed, Tim Flannery takes a close look at the potential solutions the technological developments that could save us from the most dire consequences of our torrid affair with fossil fuels.

Sunlight and Seaweed is a global story and Flannery gives us the world tour from growing truss tomatoes in the South Australian desert, to ‘3D ocean farming’ in Long Island Sound, to steam cleaning soils in China and cleaning up the Ganges in India. He shows us how technological innovation could drive a happier, healthier, more sustainable future.

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Published in October 2017, no. 395
Kate Griffiths

Kate Griffiths

Kate Griffiths is a Senior Associate at Grattan Institute. Prior to joining Grattan, Kate worked for The Boston Consulting Group with clients in the energy and health sectors, and in science and research policy for the Australian Government. Kate holds a Masters in Science from the University of Oxford and a Bachelor of Science with Honours from the Australian National University.

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