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Democracy of sorts

by
April 2005, no. 270

Reorganising Power in Indonesia: The politics of oligarchy in an age of markets by Richard Robison and Vedi R. Hadiz

Routledge-Curzon, $66 pb, 316 pp

Democracy of sorts

by
April 2005, no. 270

Many who have followed Indonesian politics have become increasingly dismayed at the failure of the reform movement that followed the political demise of President Suharto in 1998. The glass is not so much half full or empty; rather, it is cracked and leaking. Indonesia now has a democracy, of sorts, after a constitutional coup against the first elected president, Aburrahman Wahid, and the non-presidency of Megawati Sukarnoputri. In many other respects, Indonesia has regressed. The military is again a power in the state, human rights abuses have increased and there are now more political prisoners than in 1998, if mostly from Aceh and Papua. Similarly, the poor remain very poor, the rich and powerful are again such, and corruption is worse than ever.

Damien Kingsbury reviews ‘Reorganising Power in Indonesia: The politics of oligarchy in an age of markets’ by Richard Robison and Vedi R. Hadiz

Reorganising Power in Indonesia: The politics of oligarchy in an age of markets

by Richard Robison and Vedi R. Hadiz

Routledge-Curzon, $66 pb, 316 pp

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