How the Light Gets In by M.J. Hyland & Tristessa And Lucido by Miriam Zolin

Reviewed by
September 2003, no. 254
Madeleine Byrne reviews 'How the Light Gets In' by M.J. Hyland and 'Tristessa and Lucido' by Miriam Zolin

How the Light Gets In

by M.J. Hyland

Penguin, $22.95 pb, 317 pp

Book Cover 2 Small

Tristessa And Lucido

by Miriam Zolin

UQP, $22 pb, 267 pp

How the Light Gets In by M.J. Hyland & Tristessa And Lucido by Miriam Zolin

Reviewed by
September 2003, no. 254

One of Frank Moorhouse’s stories in his collection The Americans, Baby (1972) vividly describes two people’s tentative steps across a divide. It is a sexual overture, but also one that defies the constraints of national stereotypes. Carl, an Australian university student, bristles at an American man’s advances. Uneasy about his new sexual identity, he is unable to shake the sense that he is consorting with the enemy, at a time of mass protests against the Vietnam War. At the story’s end, the two men lie together in bed holding hands. The American urges his Australian lover to wipe his tears, then comments obliquely: ‘I guess this is the way it is with us.’

Madeleine Byrne reviews 'How the Light Gets In' by M.J. Hyland and 'Tristessa and Lucido' by Miriam Zolin

How the Light Gets In

by M.J. Hyland

Penguin, $22.95 pb, 317 pp

Book Cover 2 Small

Tristessa And Lucido

by Miriam Zolin

UQP, $22 pb, 267 pp

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