Mungo: The Man Who Laughs by Mungo MacCallum

by
December 2001–January 2002, no. 237

Mungo: The Man Who Laughs by Mungo MacCallum

Duffy & Snellgrove, $28pb, 292pp,

Mungo: The Man Who Laughs by Mungo MacCallum

by
December 2001–January 2002, no. 237

By the time I arrived in Canberra in the late 1970s, Mungo MacCallum was already a legend in his own lunchtime, which, as he admits in this latest book, ‘frequently dragged on towards sunset’. He was famed for introducing a new style of political journalism into Australia: irreverent, opinionated, witty, at times scurrilous. He was impatient of cant, and punctured pomposity. These qualities are all apparent in Mungo: The Man Who Laughs. It is avowedly neither autobiography nor history. It is an odd hybrid, divided distinctly into two parts: a set of autobiographical sketches devoted to his early life, laced with politics and laughter; and a personalised chronicle of the age of Gough Whitlam.

Neal Blewett reviews 'Mungo: The Man Who Laughs' by Mungo MacCallum

Mungo: The Man Who Laughs

by Mungo MacCallum

Duffy & Snellgrove, $28pb, 292pp,

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