Life Rarely Tells: An autobiography by Jack Lindsay

Reviewed by
August 1982, no. 43
Dirk den Hartog reviews 'Life Rarely Tells: An autobiography' by Jack Lindsay

Life Rarely Tells: An autobiography

by Jack Lindsay

Penguin, 838 pp, $8.95 pb

Life Rarely Tells: An autobiography by Jack Lindsay

Reviewed by
August 1982, no. 43

One heady day in the mid-1920s, sculptor and Lindsayite recruit Guy Lynch (brother of the elegaic subject of Slessor’s ‘Five Bells’), held forth in a pub at Circular Quay on his plan for Sydney to become an Hellenic city. The Quay itself he saw as a magnificent ampitheatre for the incarnation of the Lindsay group’s Nietzschean dream of Dionysian joy, as revealed in the vital art affirmed as the salvation from the twin vices of bourgeois philistinism and modernistic decadence, the canon that ran from Shakespeare, Rubens and Beethoven, to Norman Lindsay and Hugh McCrae. He-men would lean against pillars, girls would stroll about, and grand opera would be played amongst forests of statues.

‘We’ll outdo Athens’, Lynch proclaimed over the designs he had sketched on stolen toilet-paper. ‘We’ve got the men, we’ve got the ideas, we’ve got the scenery. All we need is money. What’s that? Does anyone here know what money is? Let’s have a drink and think about it.’

Dirk den Hartog reviews 'Life Rarely Tells: An autobiography' by Jack Lindsay

Life Rarely Tells: An autobiography

by Jack Lindsay

Penguin, 838 pp, $8.95 pb

You May Also Like

Leave a comment

If you are an ABR subscriber, you will need to sign in to post a comment.

If you have forgotten your sign in details, or if you receive an error message when trying to submit your comment, please email your comment (and the name of the article to which it relates) to ABR Comments. We will review your comment and, subject to approval, we will post it under your name.

Please note that all comments must be approved by ABR and comply with our Terms & Conditions.