Settler colonial dreamings

Handmaidens of imperial and settler aspirations
by
July 2022, no. 444
Buy this book

Visions of Nature: How landscape photography shaped settler colonialism by Jarrod Hore

University of California Press, US$29.95 pb, 352 pp

Settler colonial dreamings

Handmaidens of imperial and settler aspirations
by
July 2022, no. 444
Taken less than five miles downriver from the 1836 grid, this photograph frames a harmonic interaction of settlement, agriculture, and geography on the lowlands along the Derwent River. John Beattie, Hop Garden, New Norfolk, 1895–98. Albumen print. Collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney. Accession number 202.1989.
Taken less than five miles downriver from the 1836 grid, this photograph frames a harmonic interaction of settlement, agriculture, and geography on the lowlands along the Derwent River. John Beattie, Hop Garden, New Norfolk, 1895–98. Albumen print. Collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney. Accession number 202.1989.

‘Country’ – the land of Indigenous peoples (minus their Dreamings) – is the great subject of settler-colonial art, an act of appropriation in which the dispossession of its original custodians is rendered invisible. As Jarrod Hore establishes beyond doubt in Visions of Nature, it was landscape photographers who proved to be one of the more significant cultural agents of settler colonialism across the Pacific Rim in the second half of the nineteenth century. What his important study reveals even more clearly is just how much they and their images were shaped by the times and societies in which they worked.

Gary Werskey reviews 'Visions of Nature: How landscape photography shaped settler colonialism' by Jarrod Hore

Visions of Nature: How landscape photography shaped settler colonialism

by Jarrod Hore

University of California Press, US$29.95 pb, 352 pp

Buy this book

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