Impassioned and violent

A panoramic view of a largely misunderstood era
by
August 2021, no. 434
Buy this book

The Age of Acrimony: How Americans fought to fix their democracy, 1865–1915 by Jon Grinspan

Bloomsbury, $64.99 hb, 382 pp

Impassioned and violent

A panoramic view of a largely misunderstood era
by
August 2021, no. 434

William Darrah Kelley – a Republican congressman from Philadelphia – stood at the front of a stage in Mobile, Alabama, watching as a group of men pushed and shoved their way through the audience towards him. It was May 1867, Radical Reconstruction was underway, and Southern cities like Mobile were just beginning a revolutionary expansion and contraction of racial equality and democracy. The Reconstruction Acts, passed by Congress that year, granted formerly enslaved men the right to vote and to run for office in the former Confederate states. Northern Republicans streamed into cities across the South in 1867, speaking to both Black and white, to the inspired and hostile – registering Black voters and strengthening the already strong links between African Americans and the party.

Samuel Watts reviews 'The Age of Acrimony: How Americans fought to fix their democracy, 1865–1915' by Jon Grinspan

The Age of Acrimony: How Americans fought to fix their democracy, 1865–1915

by Jon Grinspan

Bloomsbury, $64.99 hb, 382 pp

Buy this book

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