Lucas Grainger-Brown reviews 'Firing Line: Australia's path to war (Quarterly Essay 62) by James Brown

Lucas Grainger-Brown reviews 'Firing Line: Australia's path to war (Quarterly Essay 62) by James Brown

Firing Line: Australia's path to war (Quarterly Essay 62)

by James Brown

Black Inc. $22.99 pb, 106 pp, 9781863958417

Australians must start 'thinking like hawks, while moving like doves', James Brown asserts in his viscerally illustrated but poorly argued Firing Line: Australia's path to war. Amid a darkening security outlook – subtext: a rising China – Australia must awaken from its complacency and foster a new national strategy based upon genuine and informed debate about war and our place in the world. Unfortunately, Brown undercuts his reasonable pro-position by insinuating that this debate must result in a deeper dependence on the United States.

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Published in August 2016, no. 383
Lucas Grainger-Brown

Lucas Grainger-Brown

Lucas Grainger-Brown is a Melbourne-based writer and former management consultant to the federal government. He is currently completing PhD student and tutor at The University of Melbourne, focusing on national identity and globalisation in the Howard era. He has written for numerous journals and news media and has authored two novellas, a short story collection, and the novel Cleopatra's Daughter (2016).

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