Pam Macintyre

Pam Macintyre

Pam Macintyre is the editor of Viewpoint: On Books For Young Adults and teaches in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education at the University of Melbourne.

 

Pam Macintyre reviews 'Burning for Revenge' by John Marsden

December 1997–January 1998, no. 197 01 December 1997
Pam Macintyre reviews 'Burning for Revenge' by John Marsden
The fifth book in a planned series of seven would not be surprising if it were science fiction or fantasy. But Burning for Revenge is neither, rather its connections are with the much more currently unfashionable genres of adventure and war stories. And what a war adventure series it is. This fifth volume, in hardback, has been on the bestseller lists in this journal and daily newspapers since its ... (read more)

Pam Macintyre reviews 'Preloved' by Shirley Marr, 'Night Beach' by Kirsty Eagar and 'The Messenger Bird' by Rosanne Hawke

July–August 2012, no. 343 04 July 2012
Adolescent girls aged sixteen to seventeen are at the centre of these three Young Adult novels: girls whose heightened emotional states prompt supernatural events. Broken families, disconnection from parents, obsession, music, art, and death impel the protagonists to seek solace and healing in the metaphysical. For Shirley Marr (Black Dog Books, $18.95 pb, 272 pp, 9781742031903), it is the Chinese ... (read more)

Pam Macintyre reviews 'Taj and the Great Camel Trek' by Rosanne Hawke

September 2011, no. 334 22 August 2011
Pam Macintyre reviews 'Taj and the Great Camel Trek' by Rosanne Hawke
To make Ernest Giles’s trek across the scrub and desert of southern Australia interesting to younger readers, relate it through the eyes of a young protagonist. It was an inspired choice to invent Taj, twelve-year-old son of the historical figure Saleh Mohamed, Afghan cameleer, and an equally inspired choice to invent Taj’s beloved young camel, Mustara. The love and respect between camel and b ... (read more)

Pam Macintyre reviews 'Good Oil' by Laura Buzo

February 2011, no. 328 04 May 2011
There is much to like in this début Young Adult novel: its straightforward storytelling, distinctive central characters, well-tuned adolescent dialogue, and humorous depiction of first love. Fifteen-year-old Amelia attends a girls-onlyschool, has two sisters – one away at university, the other just three years old – and a theatre director father who has a hands-off approach to parenting. Her ... (read more)