Hamish Hamilton

Ellen van Neerven reviews The Yield by Tara June Winch

Ellen van Neerven
29 July 2019

Wiradjuri writer Tara June Winch is not afraid to play with the form and shape of fiction. Her dazzling début, Swallow the Air (2006), is a short novel in vignettes that moves qu More

James Ley reviews Breath by Tim Winton

James Ley
21 June 2019

One of the intriguing things about Breath, Tim Winton’s first novel in seven years, is that it has a number of affinities with his very first book, An Open Swimmer (198 More

Jack Callil reviews Spring by Ali Smith

Jack Callil
17 May 2019
Uncertainty is the new norm. Nationalist rhetoric is rife. Donald Trump is running for the US presidency. It’s June 2016 and the Brexit referendum has dazed the international community, her More

Louise Swinn reviews The Boat by Nam Le

Louise Swinn
23 April 2019

At a time when some fiction writers are busy defending their right to incorporate autobiographical elements, and some non-fiction writers are being charged with fabrication, it seems timel More

Astrid Edwards reviews Diving into Glass: A memoir by Caro Llewellyn

Astrid Edwards
26 March 2019

Memoirs of illness are tricky. The raw material is often compelling: dramatic symptoms, embarrassing public moments, and unavoidable relationship pressures. The challenge is to share that More

Chris Murray reviews Fusion by Kate Richards

Chris Murray
25 January 2019

Fusion is the fiction début from the author of the acclaimed Madness: A memoir (2013). It draws on Australian gothic and older gothic traditions. With the meditative pos More

James Der Derian reviews 'The Snowden Files' by Luke Harding and 'No Place to Hide' by Glenn Greenwald

James Der Derian
26 May 2014
1984 is back. George Orwell’s nightmare vision of governmental surveillance, secrecy, and deception clearly resonates with the revelations first leaked to the Guardian by former National Security Agen More

Kári Gíslason reviews 'His Stupid Boyhood: A memoir' by Peter Goldsworthy

Kári Gíslason
13 November 2013

Italo Calvino once observed that the ideal condition for a writer is ‘close to anonymity’, adding that ‘the more the author’s figure invades the field, the more the world he portra More

Matthew Lamb reviews 'The Australian Moment: How We Were Made for These Times' by George Megalogenis

Matthew Lamb
21 March 2012

In The Australian Moment: How We Were Made for These Times, George Megalogenis tries to explain how, in spite of ourselves, we managed to survive the last three ‘super crashes o More