Adam Rivett

Adam Rivett reviews 'A History of Books' by Gerald Murnane

Adam Rivett
28 May 2012

The autobiography, that seemingly inevitable act of self-revelation, is frequently a work tricked out with very little art. For the novelist, unlike the anecdote-disposing musician or painter, the problem is doubled: they are making a home with the same tools. Rare is the autobiography that, like Nabokov’s Speak, Memory (1951) or Martin Amis’s Experience (2001), speaks in ... More

Adam Rivett reviews 'A Tiger in Eden' by Chris Flynn

Adam Rivett
27 February 2012

For ex-Orangeman Billy, history is a nightmare from which he’s trying to get a good night’s sleep. Haunted by ‘all the bloody faces of Catholic lads I done over and worse’, he’s an exile in Thailand, regularly numbing himself with cheap sex, beer, and the occasional fight. He claims he’s never seen the sunrise sober in his life. Things are about to change.More

Sonya Hartnett: Wolf Creek

Adam Rivett
21 January 2012

‘Pinched meanness’

Adam Rivett

 

Wolf Creek (Australian Screen Classics)
by Sonya Hartnett
Currency Press, $16.95 pb, 64 pp, 9780868199122

 

Wolf Creek, released in 2005, was always smarter than your average slasher. Anchored by a brillian ... More

Adam Rivett reviews 'The Cook' by Wayne Macauley

Adam Rivett
27 September 2011

For a work that deals heavily with culinary aspirations, it is going to be hard to review Wayne Macauley’s brilliant new novel The Cook without reference to Masterchef, so let’s get it out of the way early. This year, after each new episode of the television show aired, the assorted snark-addled wits of the Fairfax press gathered online to do their mocking work. The mechan ... More

Adam Rivett reviews 'The Life' by Malcolm Knox

Adam Rivett
24 May 2011

How would Dennis Keith – or, if we’re using the language of legends, DK – characterise it? ‘The Life was this mythic world where you could surf as much as you want, every day, any day, go anywhere [...] Getting waves was everything, every day.’ In Malcolm Knox’s exceptional new novel, this world – with its singular focus, and its sacred ecstasies – is revealed in a language both ... More

Adam Rivett reviews 'Gone' by Jennifer Mills

Adam Rivett
24 March 2011

Writing in the Guardian late last year, Philip Pullman said this of what he regards as the dominant style in contemporary fiction: ‘What I dislike about the present-tense narrat More