Southerly, Vol. 70, No. 1 edited by David Brooks and Elizabeth McMahon

by
September 2010, no. 324
Simon West reviews 'Southerly, Vol. 70, No. 1' edited by David Brooks and Elizabeth McMahon

Southerly, Vol. 70, No. 1

edited by David Brooks and Elizabeth McMahon

Brandl & Schlesinger, $63 p.a., 240 pp

Southerly, Vol. 70, No. 1 edited by David Brooks and Elizabeth McMahon

by
September 2010, no. 324

In a 1995 interview for the Paris Review, Ted Hughes was asked if the 1960s boom in translated poetry in the United Kingdom, particularly with series such as the Penguin Modern European Poets, had had an effect on poetry written in English. ‘Has it modified the British tradition!’ he replied. ‘Everything is now completely open, every approach, with infinite possibilities. Obviously the British tradition still exists as a staple of certain historically hard-earned qualities if anybody is still there who knows how to inherit them. Raleigh’s qualities haven’t become irrelevant. When I read Primo Levi’s verse I am reminded of Raleigh. But for young British poets, it’s no longer the only tradition, no longer a tradition closed in on itself and defensive.’

Simon West reviews 'Southerly, Vol. 70, No. 1' edited by David Brooks and Elizabeth McMahon

Southerly, Vol. 70, No. 1

edited by David Brooks and Elizabeth McMahon

Brandl & Schlesinger, $63 p.a., 240 pp

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