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No absolutes

by
May 2010, no. 321

What Science Knows: And how it knows it by James Franklin

Encounter Books, $33.95 hb, 283 pp

No absolutes

by
May 2010, no. 321

There are three ways to read this delightful book. The first – your reviewer’s method – is to romp through it picking places to linger and relish. The second way is to take a few months off and study every page, taking notes. Students and specialists will do this and be rewarded. The third way is to have it handy on the shelf to return to when a topic turns up needing clarification.

James Franklin has written a primer on the philosophy of science and epistemology. He visits all the usual heroes and villains, plus a few unexpected ones: I would not have predicted a role for Yes, Minister in this kind of guide, but it is full of such deft diversions. It also has a succession of ‘breakouts’ and standalone quotations.

Robyn Williams reviews 'What Science Knows: And how it knows it' by James Franklin

What Science Knows: And how it knows it

by James Franklin

Encounter Books, $33.95 hb, 283 pp

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