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George Megalogenis

Dear Editor, Mark Triffitt's review of George Megalogenis's Australia's Second Chance: What our history tells us about our future and Balancing Act (May 2016) left me ...

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AUSTRALIA’S SECOND CHANCE by George Megalogenis & BALANCING ACT by George Megalogenis

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May 2016, no. 381

Compared to the epic narratives of America and Europe, our story can seem rather unglamorous. Australia's 'tyranny of distance' from the seismic events of world history induces a vague sense that Australians labour under a certain tyranny of irrelevance. Perhaps we don't look hard enough to appreciate what is unique about our past. Or is is that our innate sense of ...

Writing is the best excuse I've found to play music all day. And to understand my country.

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In The Australian Moment: How We Were Made for These Times, George Megalogenis tries to explain how, in spite of ourselves, we managed to survive the last three ‘super crashes of the digital age’. He does so by actively avoiding the usual partisan morality tales, complete with intra-party rivalry ...

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Trivial Pursuit: Leadership and the End of the Reform Era (Quarterly Essay 40) by George Megalogenis & The Party Thieves: The Real Story of the 2010 Election by Barrie Cassidy

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December 2010–January 2011, no. 327

Political writers are much like their sports-writing cousins. Most simply tell it as they see it, recounting the highs and lows of the game, the winners and losers, the statistics and scoreline. Some – courtesy of a flair for language, a well-stocked contacts book, or the perspective that comes from being a former player or a veteran observer ...

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In a recent column in the Australian, George Megalogenis looked back to Arthur Fadden’s budget of 1952 as a possible comparison with the current financial situation. Few political scientists, let alone journalists, display this sort of historical memory. In 2006, Megalogenis published The Longest Decade, an account of the combined years of Paul Keating and Howard, based upon extensive interviews with the two leaders. The book was reviewed in ABR by Neal Blewett (November 2006), who regarded the book as a useful ‘bullshit detector’ on his newspaper colleagues, whose political journalism appeared in The Howard Factor that same year.

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