Ashley Hay

Ashley Hay

Ashley Hay's awards include the Colin Roderick Award and the NSWPLA People’s Choice (for The Railwayman’s Wife) and the Bragg/UNSW Press Prize for Science Writing for ‘The Forest at the Edge of Time’, the original version of which was written for the ABR Dahl Trust Fellowship. Her most recent novel, A Hundred Small Lessons, was shortlisted for the 2017 Queensland Literary Awards and is set in Brisbane, where she now lives.

Ashley Hay reviews 'In the Garden of the Fugitives' by Ceridwen Dovey

April 2018, no. 400 23 March 2018
Ashley Hay reviews 'In the Garden of the Fugitives' by Ceridwen Dovey
I was never brave enough to visit Pompeii, partly due to an overactive imagination that combined a sense of the ferocity of Vesuvius’s blast in 79 CE and the volcano’s ongoing muttering with thoughts of the city’s Roman residents, cauterised in the eruption: outstretched hands; a dog expiring mid-roll; a mother and her child. The shapes that people Pompeii are not strictly bodies. They are ... (read more)

Ashley Hay reviews 'In Love with Betty the Crow: The first 40 years of ABC RN's 'The Science Show'' by Robyn Williams

May 2016, no. 381 26 April 2016
Ashley Hay reviews 'In Love with Betty the Crow: The first 40 years of ABC RN's 'The Science Show'' by Robyn Williams
When David Attenborough's memoir Life on Air was published in 2002, the magazine I worked for arranged for me to interview him. By then I had been interviewing people for a while and thought myself quite unflusterable. I keyed in the number, listened to the dial tone. And then it was as if the call had been answered by God (interesting, as an atheist). My recording device failed, and I did an awfu ... (read more)

ABR Dahl Trust Fellowship: 'The Forest at the Edge of Time' by Ashley Hay

October 2015, no. 375 24 September 2015
Let’s begin, somewhere around 4,500 bce, in a small patch of soil on the south-west coast of Western Australia. An ovule and some pollen combine on the crest of a ridge overlooking the sea, and a plant begins to grow. It’s a little thing with juvenile leaves which will become a faintly glossy bluish-grey green as it matures. This is a eucalypt, a mallee, and it flowers with small white blossom ... (read more)