Morag Fraser: 'Fear and loathing in American politics'

Reviewed by
February 2012, no. 338

Morag Fraser: 'Fear and loathing in American politics'

Reviewed by
February 2012, no. 338

The Princeton Post Office, as befits this famed university town, has a certain grandeur. It is small – Princeton is a village after all – and modest in its proportions, but grand in aspiration. As you step through its panelled doors your gaze is drawn by the long parade of milk-glass and bronze lights towards the mural that adorns the far wall. Like the White House murals, it is lofty, but almost domestic in its depictions of American history, American hope, American mythology. Men in knee breeches and white hose smile benignly upon a representative assembly – the Native American, the Black Man, the reclining Woman, posed amid a harvest of plenty and the symbolic paraphernalia of learning, with Princeton’s historic Nassau Hall receding behind, distant like a Tuscan hill town, and the Muse at the mural’s centre exhorting Old and New World comers alike:

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