Steven Carroll

Steven Carroll’s The Time We Have Taken is the latest in his trilogy – with The Art of the Engine Driver (2001), The Gift of Speed (2004) – about a northern suburb of Melbourne. Referred to only as ‘the suburb’, this anonymity serves to make it a universal place on the fringes of any Australian city ...

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Kerryn Goldsworthy reviews The Year of The Beast by Steven Carroll

Kerryn Goldsworthy
Friday, 22 February 2019

In his 2017 essay ‘Notes for a Novel’, illuminatingly added as a kind of afterword at the end of this book, Steven Carroll recalls a dream that he had twenty years ago. It was this dream, he says, that grew into a series of novels centred on the Melbourne suburb of Glenroy, a series of which this novel is the sixth and last. It was ...

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In his fiction, Steven Carroll stretches and slows time. He combines this with deliberate over-explaining and repetition, the echoing of memories and ideas, coincidence, and theatricality. A distinctive rhythm results: when reading his work, I often find myself nodding in time to the words. Occasionally – and it happens now and again in his new novel, A New En ...

Kerryn Goldsworthy reviews 'Forever Young' by Steven Carroll

Kerryn Goldsworthy
Wednesday, 27 May 2015
Most Australians, if asked to name a date they associate with the name Gough Whitlam, would say ‘11 November 1975’. Steven Carroll subverts this expectation at the outset ... ... (read more)

Steven Carroll on T.S Eliot in 'Tarantula's Web'

Steven Carroll
Wednesday, 30 October 2013

Private Eye said of Stephen Spender that he wasn’t so much famous as that he knew a lot of famous people. They might have said the same of John Hayward. His editorial and scholarly work notwithstanding, it’s doubtful that a biography of him would have been written had it not been for his close friendship with the premier poet of ...

Novels have been appearing in the last decade or so in which one or more of the characters are actual historical figures, often themselves writers, appearing in propria persona, not considerately disguised and renamed, as Horace Skimpole was in Bleak House, for example. Perhaps the most notorious instance in recent years is Virginia Woolf in Mich ...

Open Page with Steven Carroll

Tuesday, 23 August 2011

Why do you write?

I’m actually answering this question last because it’s had me stumped for days. The most important reason I can come up with is, because it’s fun. When I wrote The Art of the Engine Driver, I wanted it to have some of the compression and charge of a great pop song – like Please Please Me.Writing should feel ...

Patrick Allington reviews 'Spirit of Progress' by Steven Carroll

Patrick Allington
Tuesday, 23 August 2011

At the beginning of Steven Carroll’s new novel, Spirit of Progress, Michael stands on a platform of the Gare Montparnasse in Paris. Readers of Carroll’s ‘Glenroy’ trilogy will remember that Michael is Vic and Rita’s son – a boy who grew up with an unblinking grasp of his parents’ fractured marriage and who learned early to fend for himself. Now a man, Michael observes the ...