The Reformation of the Landscape: Religion, Identity, and Memory in Early Modern Britain and Ireland by Alexandra Walsham

Reviewed by
December 2011–January 2012, no. 337

The Reformation of the Landscape: Religion, Identity, and Memory in Early Modern Britain and Ireland by Alexandra Walsham

Reviewed by
December 2011–January 2012, no. 337

Australian universities have long taught early modern (c.1500–1750) English/British and European history, but with Alexandra Walsham’s recent appointment as the first female to occupy a Cambridge history chair, there are now (with Oxford’s Lyndal Roper) two Melbourne-trained early modernist Oxbridge professors. Banalities about the empire striking back are hard to resist. True, Walsham was born in Cornwall. But she emigrated to Australia as a child, and only returned to England on a postgraduate scholarship in 1990 after completing a Melbourne MA (published as Church Papists: Catholicism, Conformity and Confessional Polemic in Early Modern England, 1993) under my own teacher, Don Kennedy. Her multiple prize-winning Providence in Early Modern England (1999) grew out of a Cambridge PhD dissertation supervised by the now late and sadly lamented Patrick Collinson, whose engaging autobiographical History of a History Man (2011) includes a chapter on his own academic sojourn at Sydney from 1969 to 1976.

From the New Issue

You May Also Like

Leave a comment

If you are an ABR subscriber, you will need to sign in to post a comment.

If you have forgotten your sign in details, or if you receive an error message when trying to submit your comment, please email your comment (and the name of the article to which it relates) to ABR Comments. We will review your comment and, subject to approval, we will post it under your name.

Please note that all comments must be approved by ABR and comply with our Terms & Conditions.