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Iris Murdoch and Brian Medlin

by
May 2014, no. 361

Never Mind about the Bourgeoisie: The correspondence between Iris Murdoch and Brian Medlin 1976–1995 edited by Gillian Dooley and Graham Nerlich

Cambridge Scholars Publishing, £49.99 hb, 247 pp, 9781443855440

Iris Murdoch and Brian Medlin

by
May 2014, no. 361

If you’re a bookish type of a certain age, chances are you went through your Iris Murdoch period. You binged on novels such as The Black Prince (1973) and The Sea, The Sea (1978); you immersed yourself in her world of perplexed, agonised souls searching for meaning, falling disastrously in love with absurdly wrong people, consoling themselves with a swim or a madrigal singalong. It’s less likely that you will have read any of her philosophical writings, but you were in awe of her mind, and her eventual eclipse by Alzheimer’s seemed like a particularly cruel blow. Your impression of her is probably of a brilliant, absent-minded professor who looked like Judi Dench.

Jane Sullivan reviews 'Never Mind about the Bourgeoisie: The correspondence between Iris Murdoch and Brian Medlin 1976–1995' edited by Gillian Dooley and Graham Nerlich

Never Mind about the Bourgeoisie: The correspondence between Iris Murdoch and Brian Medlin 1976–1995

edited by Gillian Dooley and Graham Nerlich

Cambridge Scholars Publishing, £49.99 hb, 247 pp, 9781443855440

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