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Intrépide: Australian women artists in early twentieth-century France by Clem Gorman and Therese Gorman

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June–July 2020, no. 422
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Intrépide: Australian women artists in early twentieth-century France by Clem Gorman and Therese Gorman

Monash University Publishing, $34.95 pb, 268 pp

Intrépide: Australian women artists in early twentieth-century France by Clem Gorman and Therese Gorman

by
June–July 2020, no. 422

Art and Paris meant everything to Agnes Goodsir. ‘You must forgive my enthusiasm,’ she wrote. ‘Nothing else is of the smallest or faintest importance besides that.’ Goodsir was the Australian artist who painted the iconic portrait Girl with Cigarette, now in the Bendigo Art Gallery. It depicts a cool, sophisticated, free-spirited woman of the Parisian boulevards. When Goodsir created it, in 1925 or thereabouts, she had lived in Paris since the turn of the century. Apart from brief visits back to Australia, she stayed there until her death in 1939.

Goodsir is one of the better known of the twenty-eight artists whose careers are followed in this engaging and often enlightening book: other stars include Margaret Olley, Margaret Preston, and Stella Bowen.

Jane Sullivan reviews 'Intrépide: Australian women artists in early twentieth-century France' by Clem Gorman and Therese Gorman

Intrépide: Australian women artists in early twentieth-century France

by Clem Gorman and Therese Gorman

Monash University Publishing, $34.95 pb, 268 pp

Buy this book