John Charalambous: Two Greeks

Holding pattern

Donata Carrazza

 

Two Greeks
by John Charalambous
University of Queensland Press, $24.95 pb, 264 pp, 9780702239045

 

What does a young boy make of a father who carries in his pocket a knife that is used to peel fruit, behead chickens, fashion toy flutes, and potentially serves as a weapon to kill his spouse? Two Greeks,the work of third-time novelist John Charalambous, is an engaging study of the power of family and the need for identity. In similar company to Raimond Gaita’s Romulus, My Father and Christos Tsiolkas’s The Slap, the novel delves into difficult emotional territory, but does so with humour and humanity. Like its literary cousins, it has the foundations for an insightful filmic adaptation.

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Published in October 2011, no. 335
Donata Carrazza

Donata Carrazza

Donata Carrazza is a graduate of Italian language and literature from the University of Melbourne. She has worked for over twenty years in hospitality, notably at the Mildura Grand Hotel. She is Chair of the Mildura Writers’ Festival Committee and, with New York poet and academic Paul Kane, has edited two books: Vintage: A Celebration of Ten Years of the Mildura Writers’ Festival (2004) and Letters to Les (2005).