October 2016, issue no. 385

Sophia Barnes reviews 'The Convict's Daughter' by Keira Lindsey

Sophia Barnes

In the opening pages of Keira Lindsey's fictionalised history, The Convict's Daughter, a young 'currency lass' named Mary Ann Gill makes her precarious way to the third-floor ...< More

Dean Biron reviews 'One' by Patrick Holland

Dean Biron

The work of Brisbane-based author Patrick Holland is reputedly influenced by Estonian composer Arvo Pärt, whose Tabula Rasa cemented his standing ...


Chris Flynn reviews 'The Dry' by Jane Harper

Chris Flynn

There is an odd moment halfway through The Dry when Aaron Falk, the Federal Police officer unofficially investigating the apparent murder–suicide of the Hadler family ...


Dion Kagan reviews 'What Belongs To You' by Garth Greenwell

Dion Kagan

In the Bulgarian capital, Sofia, an expat American teacher goes down into the subterranean bathroom beneath the National Palace of Culture, a known beat. There he encounters ...


Joel Deane reviews 'Comfort Zone' by Lindsay Tanner

Joel Deane

I interviewed Lindsay Tanner once, back in 2012. Tanner was sixteen months retired from political life, and I had come seeking insight into the workings of the Victorian ...


Josephine Taylor reviews 'Our Tiny, Useless Hearts' by Toni Jordan

Josephine Taylor

It is the morning after a husband's affair has been discovered, and the house is in chaos: the opening to Tolstoy's Anna Karenina (1877) is deliberately evoked in Toni ...


Lucas Smith reviews 'Asylum' by John Hughes

Lucas Smith

Two doors, two characters, two colours – black and white – produce a surfeit of grey in John Hughes's short allegorical novel Asylum. Featuring a variety of forms ...


Kerryn Goldsworthy reviews 'The Last Painting of Sara de Vos' by Dominic Smith

Kerryn Goldsworthy

Australian-born Dominic Smith grew up in Sydney but has spent most of his adult life in the United States; he currently lives in Austin, Texas, where he is claimed ...


James Ley reviews 'Zero K' by Don DeLillo

James Ley

Among Don DeLillo's sixteen previous novels, White Noise (1985) is commonly held up as the apotheosis of his satirical vision, while his postwar epic Underworld ...


Kate Holden reviews 'A Loving, Faithful Animal' by Josephine Rowe

Kate Holden

'That was the summer ...' begins Josephine Rowe's début novel, A Loving, Faithful Animal, and with this classic overture she evokes that most common of literary tropes, the summer in adolescence that changes everything. But this is the summer, she continues, when a sperm whale washes up dead at Mount Martha, and all the best cartoons go off the air, replac ... More

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