December 2016, issue no. 387

Shannon Burns reviews 'The Life of D.H. Lawrence' by Andrew Harrison

Shannon Burns

Readers who expect to be treated with gentlemanly courtesy have always found D. H. Lawrence rough going. His explicit fictional representations of sex and his anti-war diatribes were widely condemned in his lifetime, and his novels were duly censored or withdrawn from sale in Britain and beyond. Lawrence’s prose style – lyrical and sensuous one moment, brusque a ... More

Ian Donaldson reviews 'The Unknown Judith Wright' by Georgina Arnott

Ian Donaldson

Literary biographers and their intended subjects at times agree and at times disagree about the stories they think should be told. J.D. Salinger and Vladimir Nabokov – the one, fastidiou More

Janna Thompson reviews 'Hume: An intellectual biography' by James A. Harris

Janna Thompson

David Hume earned his place in the philosophical pantheon mostly because of the uncompromising empiricism of his early work A Treatise of Human Nature (1738). He looked ...

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Kevin Foster reviews Phillip Schuler: The remarkable life of one of Australia’s greatest war correspondents' by Mark Baker

Kevin Foster

Who was Phillip Schuler? A war correspondent for The Age, his six-week visit to Gallipoli in July and August 1915 produced, inter alia, a few of the rare eyewitness accounts of the battle ...

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Miriam Cosic reviews 'Hitler: A biography, volume I: Ascent, 1889–1939' by Volker Ullrich and translated by Jefferson Chase

Miriam Cosic

There is a point of view that says we shouldn't humanise a tyrant such as Adolf Hitler since that reduces the symbolism, the power of his name as a synonym for pure evil, and can lead to ...

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Dennis Altman reviews 'The House that Jack Built: Jack Mundey, Green Bans hero' by James Colman

Dennis Altman

The term 'green ban', first used in 1973, is so much part of our political vocabulary that we forget it has a specific and Australian genesis, which had considerable influence on the Greens ...

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Rachel Fuller reviews 'The Worst Woman in Sydney: The life and crimes of Kate Leigh' by Leigh Straw

Rachel Fuller

The Worst Woman in Sydney is the first biography devoted to the early twentieth-century Sydney underworld matriarch Kate Leigh. Leigh Straw attempts to tease out ...

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Brenda Niall reviews 'Constance Fenimore Woolson: Portrait of a lady novelist' by Anne Boyd Rioux

Brenda Niall

If Constance Fenimore Woolson is remembered today, it is likely to be as a friend of Henry James, and a minor character in his much-chronicled life. Anne Boyd Rioux's ...

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Simon Caterson reviews 'Brett Whiteley: Art, life and the other thing' by Ashleigh Wilson

Simon Caterson

Notwithstanding the fact that he died alone in a hotel room following a heroin overdose at the age of fifty-three, Brett Whiteley led what for an Australian artist ...

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Robin Gerster reviews 'Our Man Elsewhere: In search of Alan Moorehead' by Thornton McCamish

Robin Gerster

You have to admire the professional writer who describes the chore of churning out the daily ration of words as 'like straining shit through a sock', ...

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