Monday, 05 March 2018 11:17

#19 Michael Adams reads 'Salt Blood'

Each year, ABR’s prestigious Calibre Essay Prize, one of the world’s leading prizes for a new essay, attracts some of the finest writers from Australia and overseas.

Last year, the first prize of $5,000 was awarded to Michael Adams, an associate professor of Human Geography at the Australian Centre for Cultural Environmental Research at the University of Wollongong. Before that, Michael worked for environment NGOs, the national parks service, and Aboriginal organisations. His focus is on human–nature relationships, especially with Indigenous and local communities, and he likes full-immersion methodologies. He writes in a wide variety of forms, including narrative non-fiction, online essays and peer-reviewed academic articles.

His Calibre Prize-winning essay ‘Salt Blood’, is a thought-provoking and original meditation on human evolution, the practice of freediving, and his father’s suicide. Few things we published in 2017 had such resonance with readers. We weren’t surprised when it was included in Black Inc.’s Best Australian Essays 2017.

To read 'Salt Blood' by Michael Adams, visit the June-July 2017 issue in the ABR Online archive.

To subscribe to Australian Book Review, visit our Subscriptions page.

Music by www.bensound.com

Edited, produced, and introduced by Dilan Gunawardana, Deputy Editor (Digital) at Australian Book Review.

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From the Herbig family who lived in a hollowed out tree trunk to Dr Bosisto’s ‘Syrup of Red Gum’, from the trauma and regeneration of bushfires to the ill-fated Burnside Village tree, the Tree of Knowledge, and the ‘dig tree’ - how can we understand Australia’s complex relationship with the eucalypt? The October 2017 Environment issue of Australian Book Review includes the third ABR Eucalypt Fellowship essay, ‘Ambassadors from Another Time’ by South Australian novelist Stephen Orr, in which he examines Australia’s evolving understanding of these iconic trees.

Stephen Orr studied ecology at university before starting to write fiction. He has taught Biology, Agriculture, and English. He especially loves novels about science and our sometimes difficult relationship with the natural world. His most recent novel, The Hands (2015), describes a farming family trying to scratch a living from drought affected grazing country. His most recent novel is Datsunland (UQP, 2017), which was reviewed in the June-July 2017 issue of Australian Book Review.

This $7,500 Fellowship is funded by Eucalypt Australia and we acknowledge their generous support.

Music featured in this podcast comes from the 2017 album The Double by David McCooey, which can be listened to and downloaded via Spotify.

This essay appeared in the October 2017 issue of Australian Book Review. To purchase a copy of the print edition, or to access the essay online, please visit our Subscriptions page. Subscriptions start from just $10.

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Michael Halliwell interviews Australian composer, violist, and conductor Brett Dean for the ABR Podcast. Dean composed the opera Bliss based on the Peter Carey novel, and was for many years a violist with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. He was the Artistic Director of the Australian National Academy of Music(ANAM) in Melbourne, and is now an artist in residence at the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. He is currently finishing his opera adaptation of Hamlet to première at the Glyndebourne Opera Festival in June 2017.

The ABR Podcast is available via SoundCloud and iTunes.

The music featured is 'Harry's Vision' from the opera 'Bliss' (Opera Australia/ABC Classics)

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  • Custom Article Title Episode #11 Michael Halliwell in conversation with Brett Dean
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Gabriel García Ochoa reports back from Mexico following the US election in his article 'The City of Palaces' which appears in the January-February issue of Australian Book Review.

The ABR Podcast is available via SoundCloud and iTunes.

ABR Podcast intro music by David McCooey

Other music by danosongs.com and bensound.com

Comments by Donald Trump on Mexican people: www.youtube.com/watch?v=uo-7ISmwAi0

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Peter Rose interviews American Soprano Amber Wagner for the ABR Podcast following the first cycle of Richard Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen, which is being presented in Melbourne by Opera Australia. Amber Wagner plays the role of Sieglinde in the second opera Die Walküre.

The ABR Podcast is available via SoundCloud and iTunes.

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In this week’s ABR podcast Peter Rose talks to Colin Golvan QC – a lawyer specialising in intellectual property – about new threats to Australian creativity, chiefly the proposed removal of restrictions on parallel importation, as recommended by the Productivity Commission.

Colin Golvan's article 'The god of cheaper prices: New threats to our literary culture from the Productivity Commission' appears in the November Arts issue of Australian Book Review.

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Thursday, 22 September 2016 08:33

Episode #8: Vale Edward Albee

In Washington, DC, Peter Rose and regular ABR theatre critic Ian Dickson discuss the career and legacy of Edward Albee, the great American playwright who died on Friday 16 September, aged 88.

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In this episode of 'Poem of the Week' Bill Manhire reads 'Indexing Emily'. ABR Editor, Peter Rose, introduces Bill who then reads and discusses his poem.

 

Indexing Emily

The dead gaze back across their special days:
cloud above clover, crisis above the crow ...
Such new horizons, yet they still approach.
They know how eclipse and ecstacy edge along together:
whisper and wink of wind, but no real weather.

Between practice and prayer there's always praise.
Mist and mistakes are in the text.
And now here's the night – nobody's next – and poetry
falls from the crucifixion like a crumb, and belief
needs bells, needs bereavement. Bothersome.

Now a feather falls towards March
somehow recalling the snake above the snow.
Everything slows. All those ships
anticipating shipwreck: frigate, little boat.
Brain almost touching the bride. Sweet anecdote.

Can the simple be simplified? Our riches
ride on a riddle: rapture and rainbow
and remaining time. And now all the columns
of Love appear. No word of reproof, no sign
of rage. Love is like Death: it needs to turn the page.

Bill Manhire


Bill Manhire was New Zealand's inaugural Poet Laureate. He founded the well-known creative writing programme at Victoria University of Wellington. His most recent books are a collection of short fiction, The Stories of Bill Manhire (VUP, 2015), and a Selected Poems. He has also been writing songs with the jazz musician Norman Meehan.

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    In this episode of 'Poem of the Week' Bill Manhire reads 'Indexing Emily'. ABR Editor, Peter Rose, introduces Bill who then reads and discusses his poem.

In this episode of 'Poem of the Week' David McCooey reads 'Fleeting: Sylvia Plath at 80'. ABR Editor, Peter Rose, introduces David who then reads and discusses his poem.

 

Fleeting

Sylvia Plath at 80.

I have outstayed the old millennium,
lost count of years, and jobs, and meals prepared.
My children have careers; the students of my students teach.
     I have had some fame, though
     a little is enough, I know.

In an earlier age, my youthful world conspired
to render me with fires of grief,
at which I bent, and murmured my beginner's German.
And then came, as if I'd called them up,
     the mess of childbirth,
     the bedlam of men and women.

I wrote those poems – the ones for which I'm known –
in the coldest winter for two hundred years.
The snow stretched telephone wires to the ground.

The children and I hid from the historic cold
as if hiding from a fairy-tale monster.
The monster froze the river, ground, and air,
while I outstared, through all those monochrome days,
     the gaze of that greater madness
     I'd called my calling.

Then my discovery: the deranging noise –
like bees or the airy sea – that filled my stony head
was merely fleeting, like snow, or flowers, or husbands' lies
     on crackling telephone lines.
Or the brief duration of abysmal sleep.

David McCooey


David McCooey is a prize-winning poet, critic, and editor. His latest book of poems, Star Struck, will be published by UWA Publishing in October. His debut poetry collection, Blister Pack (2005) won the Mary Gilmore Award and was shortlisted for four other major national literary awards. His second full-length collection, Outside (2011), was shortlisted for the Queensland Literary Awards and was a finalist for the 2012 Melbourne Prize for Literature's 'Best Writing Award'. His work has appeared for nine out of the last ten years in Black Inc's annual anthology, The Best Australian Poems. McCooey is the deputy general editor of the prize-winning Macquarie PEN Anthology of Australian Literature (2009), published internationally as The Literature of Australia (2009), and he is the author of a critical study on Australian autobiography, Artful Histories, (1996/2009), which won a NSW Premier's Literary Award. His poems, essays and reviews have appeared in numerous books, journals, and newspapers. McCooey is also a musician and sound artist. His album of 'poetry soundtracks', Outside Broadcast, was released in 2013 as a digital download and is available for streaming on Spotify and elsewhere. He is a professor of writing and literature at Deakin University in Geelong, where he lives.

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    In this episode of 'Poem of the Week' David McCooey reads 'Fleeting: Sylvia Plath at 80'. ABR Editor, Peter Rose, introduces David who then reads and discusses his poem.

ABR's NSW 'States of Poetry' anthology was launched by state editor Elizabeth Allen and ABR Editor Peter Rose, at Gleebooks in Sydney earlier this year. ABR's esteemed Laureate David Malouf introduced the magazine's first Laureate's Fellow Michael Aiken who read extracts from his Fellowship project, 'Satan Repentant', an epic poem about themes of contrition. Elizabeth Allen, then introduced the six NSW poets who contributed their works to the anthology: David Malouf, Susie Anderson, Pam Brown, Toby Fitch, Kate Middleton, and Fiona Wright.

 The ABR Podcast is available from iTunes and SoundCloud.

You can learn more about States of Poetry and listen to the full States of Poetry Podcasts.


Information about past ABR Fellowships

The theme music for this podcast is by David McCooey. David's website is www.davidmccooey.com and his debut album Outside Broadcast is now available as a digital download. You can listen to more of his work on SoundCloud.


 

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  • Custom Article Title Episode #4: ABR States of Poetry NSW Launch at Gleebooks
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    ABR's NSW 'States of Poetry' anthology was launched by state editor Elizabeth Allen and ABR Editor Peter Rose, at Gleebooks in Sydney earlier this year. ABR's esteemed Laureate David Malouf introduced the magazine's first Laureate's Fellow Michael Aiken who read extracts from his Fellowship project, 'Satan Repentant', an epic poem about themes of contrition. Elizabeth Allen, then introduced the six NSW poets who contributed their works to the anthology: David Malouf, Susie Anderson, Pam Brown, Toby Fitch, Kate Middleton, and Fiona Wright.

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