The Newspaper of Claremont Street by Elizabeth Jolley

Reviewed by
May 1982, no. 40
Buy this book
Brian Dibble reviews 'The Newspaper of Claremont Street' by Elizabeth Jolley

The Newspaper of Claremont Street

by Elizabeth Jolley

Fremantle Arts Centre Press, $8 pb,120 pp,

Buy this book

The Newspaper of Claremont Street by Elizabeth Jolley

Reviewed by
May 1982, no. 40

Of Elizabeth Jolley’s first novel, Palomino (1980), Nancy Keesing said it ‘establishes Elizabeth Jolley as absolutely one of the best writers of fiction in this country’ (ABR, March 1981). Of The Newspaper of Claremont Street, Tom Shapcott said its ‘capacity to touch the very nerve centre of human fragility, of exposing the tragedy in human needs within the small comedy of existence, is something I have not seen done with such delicate balance and precision since the ‘Pnin’ stories of Vladimir Nabakov’ (Fremantle Arts Centre Broadsheet, January-February, 1982). Sally McInerney’s judgement of The Newspaper is that ‘this slight and disturbing novel sways between socio­political allegory (about work and non­human relations) and conventional storytelling, and the two elements work against each other’ (National Times, 17–23 January, 1982). I agree with Keesing and Shapcott, but can understand why McInerney might have come to her conclusion.

Brian Dibble reviews 'The Newspaper of Claremont Street' by Elizabeth Jolley

The Newspaper of Claremont Street

by Elizabeth Jolley

Fremantle Arts Centre Press, $8 pb,120 pp,

From the New Issue

You May Also Like

Leave a comment

If you are an ABR subscriber, you will need to sign in to post a comment.

If you have forgotten your sign in details, or if you receive an error message when trying to submit your comment, please email your comment (and the name of the article to which it relates) to ABR Comments. We will review your comment and, subject to approval, we will post it under your name.

Please note that all comments must be approved by ABR and comply with our Terms & Conditions.